How does it get to this? 600lb needs to be cut out of house by fire department

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JessWhatINee...

Joined: Jan 12
Posts: 273

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 12:03
News Report of a 600 pound man needing to get to the hospital. Firemen were called in. They had to use chainsaws to cut a hole in his house to get him out. The place was so disgusting people had to wear hazmat suits. A pulley system was needed to put him on a flatbed trailer to take to the hospital.

Man. It really brings up mixed emotions in me. I pity the guy. How this obviously embarrassing situation for him is in the news. And the things people are saying about him (I'm not helping but putting it up here, I see that). But I'm also frustrated that it came to this. How can people live like that? I don't get it. I guess just as much as I feel for him, I also am disgusted and angry that someone would let it come to this.
erika2633

Joined: Nov 11
Posts: 805

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 13:14
Yeah.. I don't understand this either.. I know there are medical conditions that cause people to gain weight, but really? There's definitely some underlying mental conditions going on too.. same thing with hoarders.. I just can't quite wrap my brain around it.


Someone who is busier than you is working out right now.
There will come a day when you can no longer do this. Today is not that day.
sjcoray

Joined: May 10
Posts: 122

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 14:12
I could be flamed massively for this - but I think a lot of this comes from a culture where we don't hold ourselves responsible nearly like we should. People out there expect quick fixes, and often times will look for someone to sue in order to get the money for those fixes. This case most definitely got to a point of no return to where he needed professional intervention in order to save his life.

Does anybody really think that they didn't get what they had because they didn't have the talent or the strength or the endurance or the commitment?
- Nelson Mandela
klbarcaskey

Joined: Apr 10
Posts: 133

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 14:21
sad. I think one of the biggest things is people who start out really overweight as children, kinda getting to a point where the problem seems too huge to fix and just give up. The worst is seeing overweight people with morbidly obese children, like they never really got a chance.
TRosales

Joined: Mar 12
Posts: 34

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 14:46
@sjcoray....awesome reply I am with you! Until individuals start taking responsibility for their own actions and start taking control back of their own lives, stories like this will be more and more and corporations will pointed at and blamed and other not so healthy choices out there. McDonalds didn't get me fat....my hands holding bad choices and shoving down my throat did! The great thing is i can fix it, the worst thing....alot of ppl will die before they open their eyes wide enough to see it was indeed fixable Sad
I didn't get fat over night so I don't expect to get healthy that way either.
Rpalmst

Joined: Oct 11
Posts: 104

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 15:01
and...here comes Farinha...
mars2kids

Joined: Mar 11
Posts: 1,293

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 15:12
Unfortunately, in a lot of these situations, the family sees this persons health deteriorating and instead of trying to help them or not giving them horrible food to eat, they just keep feeding them bad foods. It's almost like there is a cry for help there, but family and friends either don't listen or don't know what to do, so the problem just escalates. I'm sure someone who gets that size must have an emotional or mental issue that gets them to that point. I have watched the documentaries about the people who are so big they can't walk, and their kids are taking care of them, but the kids are always giving in to them and giving them junk food. I'm thinking if that were my mother, I would tell her no, and give her something healthy and eventually she would eat what I give her, and I would try to get her help for her issues. But, if it were that easy, I'm sure there wouldn't be as many people getting to that size. That is a sad story, made even more sad because it was preventable.
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JenKatja

Joined: Aug 11
Posts: 63

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 15:18
I think the thing that confuses me most is that this guy obviously could not take care of himself, so someone was bringing several thousand calories to him everyday. Why couldn't they just say..no, this is what a normal person eats, so this is what you should eat and I am not bringing you more than that. I don't know what his diet was like, but one less plate could have been helpful.
Morgen, morgen, nur nicht heute, sagen alle faulen Leute!
DairyKing

Joined: Sep 11
Posts: 275

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 15:31
I have heard people say that they love them too much to exercise "tough love." I am sure that they mean what they say. But people are not cute little puppies. Somebody should have stepped in, long before now, and said, "It's actually 'abusive' to continue to contribute to this person's deteriorating health."
" Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure, than to take rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in the grey twilight that knows not victory nor defeat."
Teddy Roosevelt
Hoser

Joined: Jul 10
Posts: 2,052

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 15:37
Professional poker writer Mike Caro talks about something called a threshold of misery when it comes to gambling losses. The general idea is that maybe it hurts to lose $50. It hurts more to lose $100. It hurts more than that to lose $200. Maybe your threshold of misery is $300. Losing $300 hurts more than $200, but you've now reached a wall. Losing $400 doesn't feel worse than losing $300. At this point, you've basically given up, and you're just as likely to lose $1000 as $300.

I'm sure the same thing is true with weight. At some point, you just sort of give up, and it doesn't matter to you if you weight 400 lbs or 600 or 1000. It's just hopeless at any weight, so why bother.

Plus, people who get into this state probably don't have any real knowledge about nutrition or healthy eating. They don't have the skills required for breaking out of their patterns. If you're stuck in a pit and you really have no idea what to do, you may well just give up.
sjcoray

Joined: May 10
Posts: 122

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 15:43
So my grandma has dimentia - she's been slowly going down hill for a while. It used to be that she liked to have a gin and tonic (or two...or three) in the afternoons, but the doctor said to keep her physical health up, my aunt, who is taking care of her, should limit her alcohol to one drink a day and no more than two a week.

My aunt goes on vacation and I offer to take care of Grandma (I am her only namesake after all) for the week. Before I left, my aunt instructs me that we can go out to dinner one night, and I can let her have one drink when we go out. She even practices saying "nooooooooooo" with me (yeah, seems silly, but that's my family).

Dinner comes and we're out - most everyone else is having multiple drinks and my grandma asks the server for another drink. This young man has been instructed already, by me, that she will not be getting a 2nd, so he looks at me. Grandma and I basically spend the rest of the evening fighting (this poor server) over whether or not she gets a second drink.

Have you ever had one of these fights with someone with dimentia? I assure you, they're tough as beans because more than likely they don't remember how long the argument has been going on or how annoying it's become.

Finally, at the end of the night - I cave, she gets one more drink.

When my aunt came back, I very apologetically told her that I failed, to which my aunt laughed and said, "it's okay, I probably would have let her have the second drink too."

...

So where's the line? The second drink clearly didn't negatively affect my grandma's health - but eventually more and more would have. (That was about 5 years ago and she's still hanging on, she's a fighter, hope I have that in me too Razz )


Does anybody really think that they didn't get what they had because they didn't have the talent or the strength or the endurance or the commitment?
- Nelson Mandela
JenKatja

Joined: Aug 11
Posts: 63

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 15:54
sjcoray - but if you continued to let her have 2 drinks every day, and then you started to see some mental deficit or the doc saw some liver damage because of it, would it be responcible to continue to allow it? If the caregiver of the fat man saw that giving him dessert was adding to his weight and inability to move, shouldn't they stop doing it?
Morgen, morgen, nur nicht heute, sagen alle faulen Leute!
TRosales

Joined: Mar 12
Posts: 34

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 16:07
We are all trying to be of well body and mind so the glass we look through at the moment is not the same window maybe the mother of this 600 lb man may be or caretaker. I have never been in a situation to know someone so morbidly obese therefore I can't say what i would or wouldn't do. Knowing myself and if it was a child I could see the pain in their eyes of not having or getting what they need as a deep burden on both parties. Add in the constant fighting over food and types of food and well it doesn't get any better. This is after all a grown man, yes others didn't stop him from getting bigger and bigger but in the same breathe he didn't stop himself either. this is where ttaking responsibility for ones own actions come into play...a total domino effect.
I didn't get fat over night so I don't expect to get healthy that way either.
sjcoray

Joined: May 10
Posts: 122

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 16:11
I think the point more is - it's easier to sit back when you're totally removed from the situation and say, "well, clearly they shouldn't be doing x and x" but then when you get into the situation, it's totally different.

How many times have you not said something truthful, but potentially hurtful to the people you love in your life because you didn't want to rock your relationship with them?

It takes a lot of guts to tell your sister that you think she's in an abusive relationship. Or your brother-in-law that perhaps he shouldn't drive after that 4th glass of wine. Or maybe your best friend that she's really not going to succeed at selling make-up house to house?

What if that person you really care for has the tendency to drop complicated people from their lives. Are you willing to risk losing that person from your life completely over a slice of key lime pie?

Does anybody really think that they didn't get what they had because they didn't have the talent or the strength or the endurance or the commitment?
- Nelson Mandela
klbarcaskey

Joined: Apr 10
Posts: 133

      quote  
Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 16:14
Hoser wrote:
Professional poker writer Mike Caro talks about something called a threshold of misery when it comes to gambling losses. The general idea is that maybe it hurts to lose $50. It hurts more to lose $100. It hurts more than that to lose $200. Maybe your threshold of misery is $300. Losing $300 hurts more than $200, but you've now reached a wall. Losing $400 doesn't feel worse than losing $300. At this point, you've basically given up, and you're just as likely to lose $1000 as $300.

I'm sure the same thing is true with weight. At some point, you just sort of give up, and it doesn't matter to you if you weight 400 lbs or 600 or 1000. It's just hopeless at any weight, so why bother.

Plus, people who get into this state probably don't have any real knowledge about nutrition or healthy eating. They don't have the skills required for breaking out of their patterns. If you're stuck in a pit and you really have no idea what to do, you may well just give up.


I so agree, the depression that comes with the weight can be crippling for so many people. I cant even imagine getting to that point, but i can imagine if i had a hundred pounds to loose how hopeless that might feel.
fatoldlady

Joined: Jul 11
Posts: 296

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 17:47
I know exactly how that feels....pretty daunting. After a lifetime of fighting my weight and losing I just gave up and resigned myself to the fact that I will always be fat. When it got to a point where I could end up in a wheelchair I was fortunate enough to find a way to make what I am hoping is a permanent change. When I hear of stories like this I just feel sadness and empathy, there, but for the grace of god, go I.
kstubblefiel...

Joined: May 10
Posts: 1,400

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 18:28
I don't think it's fair to assume they don't have the knowledge to control their weight. I've always considered myself a smart person who knew a lot about what's healthy & what's not, yet I allowed myself to balloon up to 316 lbs. Mental/emotional issues are at the root of such extreme obesity IMO, & anyone who has struggled with depression &/or anxiety knows that you can KNOW in your heart what you SHOULD be doing...& be paralyzed when it comes to actually doing it.

Kat | NO EXCUSES, JUST RESULTS | Next milestone - 256: 60 lbs lost
2013: still up from 1/1, but coming back down...
2010: 50.4 lbs lost | 2011:17 lbs lost | 2012: 1 lb gained
How I did it: http://stubbysticks.wordpress.com/weight-loss-summary-by-month/
JenKatja

Joined: Aug 11
Posts: 63

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Posted: 11 Apr 2012, 20:43
for regular fat people like me...those who can blessfully still walk to the fridge and drive the the store, yes, it is all about what we want and how we control ourselves. But those who are so debilitated by fat that they must rely on someone else for access to food, I think their caregivers are also to blame.
Morgen, morgen, nur nicht heute, sagen alle faulen Leute!
sesnyde

Joined: Jun 10
Posts: 35

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Posted: 20 Apr 2012, 15:38
JenKatja wrote:
I think the thing that confuses me most is that this guy obviously could not take care of himself, so someone was bringing several thousand calories to him everyday. Why couldn't they just say..no, this is what a normal person eats, so this is what you should eat and I am not bringing you more than that. I don't know what his diet was like, but one less plate could have been helpful.


I so agree with this. Every time I've seen stories like this, I see the caregivers taking them tons of food... and whatever they want! If they can't get out of bed or off the sofa to get it, then surely someone can keep it out of their hands and limit them! I know I am the only one responsible for putting the food in my own mouth. If I were dependent on someone else, then I should hope they'd love me enough to restrict what I ate! IMO.



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