Obesity rates still rising in the US

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k8yk

Joined: Jan 09
Posts: 4,546

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 12:10
Obesity Rates Keep Rising, Troubling Health Officials

And interestingly enough, a particular part of the country seems hardest hit. Why do you think that is? Poverty is a big indicator of obesity. Maybe a cultural thing about big dinners and "southern fried" food? Not sure (and really not trying to offend anyone). It's interesting though. I could have told you people are getting fatter because I see it with my eyes every day. Do you notice it too?

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Saralyn

Joined: Mar 10
Posts: 70

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 12:12
What's up with Colorado?

I find it interesting when there is a singularity surrounded by other trends.
Challenges can be stepping stones or stumbling blocks, it's just a matter of how you view them.
russellb97

Joined: Mar 10
Posts: 524

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 12:41
k8yk wrote:
Obesity Rates Keep Rising, Troubling Health Officials

And interestingly enough, a particular part of the country seems hardest hit. Why do you think that is? Poverty is a big indicator of obesity. Maybe a cultural thing about big dinners and "southern fried" food? Not sure (and really not trying to offend anyone). It's interesting though. I could have told you people are getting fatter because I see it with my eyes every day. Do you notice it too?



Yeah I definitely see it. When I was growing up I was one of a handful of kids that were overweight, now it seems like every other kid is overweight. I know it's not that much but it seems like it. Also if you just stop and watch people in a parking lot, count just ten people walking by and see how many you consider overweight. The biggest problem IMO is lack of knowledge, or for those with knowledge, it's the lack of caring. I know the rate is higher in low income areas but just because money is tight doesn't mean you have to eat excess calories of bad foods. 6 days a week I eat great, very healthy and then one day I don't. I spend a lot more money on my Spike Day foods then the other days, simply because I eat so much more.

So what I am saying is, even if the excuse is you can't afford healthier options you can still choose to eat less.

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Phule

Joined: Jun 10
Posts: 183

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 12:47
Saralyn wrote:
What's up with Colorado?

I find it interesting when there is a singularity surrounded by other trends.


Air is too thin in Colorado to support fat! Wink

As for the South being hardest hit. That is exactly it K8yk, poverty and culture. Although when I say poverty I mean the American version not real poverty. I have been to countries with real poverty, where people literally starve to death from being so poor. ANYWAY, I grew up poor in South Carolina. The food is terribly unhealthy. We even prepared our vegetables with a slice of salt cured pork fat in them for flavor. Tons of butter in everything. We even had a Frydaddy so we could fry up most everything. Exercise was what you did doing manual labor not something you did for the sake of being fit or healthy.

Being poor doesn't mean you can't afford healthy foods either. Vegetables are fairly cheap. I think it mostly comes down to a matter of convenience and lack of responsibility. No one is responsible for their own actions any longer and since so many other people are obese it's much more acceptable these days.

I underwent a huge lifestyle change when I moved to Arizona. The food was healthier and exercising to stay fit was normal. You could see the difference in the populous as well. Much smaller overall than I was used to seeing in South Carolina. Now I live in Southern Illinois and this region is actually worse than South Carolina! I'm considered stick skinny here even though I'm actually in the overweight range!
karbear45

Joined: Mar 10
Posts: 317

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 12:50
Some of it could be what they consider obese. Myself, yes I knew I was overweight, but I was shocked to learn from the BMI that I was "obese". Friends and family don't see me as obese either. The weight just came on so gradual for me. Even when I would buy new clothes (which I don't very often) I just thought the size increase was the clothing manufactures changing whats what. Then when my blood work numbers started to change, I started checking ways to improve them and one search led to another to a BMI calculator.

I also think people are busier than we used to be. All the little league, pee-wee football, youth wrestling, dance, etc. We all tend to think our kids need to be in everything and then you have to drive them to whereever, and go to the games (or you are a bad parent), so we've made our lives too busy to notice all the fast food or processed food, and drinking a Coke at a ball game, it's 2nd nature. Growing up (I'm only 46) we only had Pepsi when we had popcorn, and then it was a glass, not the entire 16 oz bottle, now it's not unusal to see cases of cans in peoples homes. I see elementary kids drinking a 20 oz bottle of soda before school starts. The cereals have a lot of sugar in them as well, so even if you do get a breakfast in them, price, tastes and marketing, make the kids want the sugary cereals (they used to hide toys in them remember?)

I also agree that eating healthier is much more expensive and if you still have kids at home, that is a major factor in what we choose to feed our kids.

Just a few of my thoughts.
~~Karbear45~~
zacali

Joined: May 10
Posts: 65

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 12:53
I notice it too and mostly in the poorer nieghbourhoods. I worked in a community center in a very poor nieghbourhood of my city and it's awful. They problem is the availibility of food.There is only one gorcery store and the food is expensive and the fruit and veggies are awful. When I lived in that area I would take the bus and go to the big discount store about 25 min away,but most people it isn't a pirority to eat healthy they just want to eat cheap and they don't have the time to run around for discounts or don't know where to go. Also most are not educated on how to prepare good tasting healthy meals for less.We have a small food bank to help out the members but most of the stuff we get is junk. so imagine you have less than 100$ a month for food and have to feed a family of 4 and get mostly junk from the food bank and then the food you buy is expensive you eat whatever you can get. We finnaly got a small weekly farmers market in the area but unfortunatly the veggies and fruit are still a little expensive but the activities there help with the education.At least it's a little step. When I worked in the center's kitchen I would always try to cook healthy and on budget it was always a huge challenge.

A bag of milk(4l) 6$ verse 4l of pop 2$
broccoli 1.25$ and up verse a box of of store brand KD mac less than 1$
A bag of apples 3lb 5$ verse a bag of chips 1$

on a fixed budget what would you choose to survive? Most would the junk.I've done it,and I know many that do.Lower the price of healthy food and raise the bad food and people would make better choices.Most want to eat healthy but they don't want to spend there entire months budget in one week.

Oh dear I can go on forever on this subject because I lived it and seen it first hand.
Phule

Joined: Jun 10
Posts: 183

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 12:59
I have to disagree that eating healthier costs more. Unless you're talking about buying Weight Watchers and Lean Cuisine it's cheaper. Vegetables are cheap and if you go to a farmer's market you can buy a weeks worth for $15-$20. Is it as easy as popping a microwave dinner in for 3 minutes or swinging by McDonald's? Of course not. That makes it less convient not more expensive. I'm guilty of this myself so I'm not pointing fingers. I'm just saying it doesn't cost more to eat healthy, it does however, require us to be more involved in our food choices and for most people the laziness factor wins out. As for kids eating poorly, that's on the parents. If your kids eat garbage, it's because you let them.
Runesinger

Joined: May 10
Posts: 578

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 13:00
I noticed Washington State ticked up a category. I have actually seen a lot more overweight people around than I used to see - especially children. It's really sad. I'm not sure what is causing it. Maybe there is not as much emphasis on high-protein foods, and too much emphasis on empty-calorie foods. Washington State used to be so health and fitness conscious, and we are a major fruit-growing state, so it's not like healthy options aren't available. Heck, this time of year blackberries are free. You just have to pick them off the bushes.

Of course, I am still part of the problem, but I'm working on that.
kmartin

Joined: Jan 10
Posts: 1,490

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 13:02
I haven't gone and read through all of these posts, so forgive me if I am repeating something already said. It's not the poverty that is causing obesity. Hello, if you are too poor to buy enough food, you are most likely not going to get fat. The problem is that people that live in poverty stricken areas lack the basic principles of healthy eating. Most of these people are not overly educated, therefore do not understand how harmful their foods are for them.
Welcome to your journey - May it be prosperous.

Dear Lord, You are the beginning and the end of this great narrative called history. Thank You for writing me into the story. Though I play only a small part, may I play it well. May I honor You with my days and my choices and may I truly know that Your grace works. In Jesus’ Name, Amen
~Ariel Allison Lawhon
runnette

Joined: Jul 10
Posts: 65

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 13:10
Saralyn wrote:
What's up with Colorado?

I find it interesting when there is a singularity surrounded by other trends.



I've lived in Colorado for the past 11 years (originally from PA and DC), and I would say it has a lot to do with the outdoors and the active lifestyle that people lead here. When I first moved here, I didn't do much in the way of exercise unless it was a recreational softball game or something like that, and I loved burritos, chocolate and a ton of artificial creamer in my coffee. The longer you live someplace (I think), the more you adapt the community's tendencies -- all of a sudden, I had friends who hiked, did triathlons, skied, did 150-mile bike races, etc. In my case, I adopted healthier eating habits and exercise. Three years ago, I started running (for the first time since college in 1990), and completed a 10-mile race at the end of the summer. I also changed my diet and started eating better. I run, I hike, I ski/snowshoe in the winter, and I will be getting a bicycle for the first time since I was a kid (lol) ... it's a complete 180 from the way I grew up back East. I do have a burrito once in a while, but I take all the carbs out of it, ask for extra meat and beans, and eat only half of it at a time. Wink

I believe it has a lot to do with who you talk to on a regular basis, and whether or not they are committed to the same things that you are, when it comes to health and fitness.

If you don't have a group around you that supports your commitment to diet, exercise, losing weight, being fit (whatever your commitment is), I would recommend finding one. You have to have something that pulls you toward what you want (the goal you want to achieve) that outweighs the temptations, etc. that don't give you the goal you want.

Just my two cents. Smile
~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Live a life less ordinary; live a live extraordinary. - Carbon Leaf
erin74kr

Joined: Jul 10
Posts: 206

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 13:14
Phule wrote:
I have to disagree that eating healthier costs more. Unless you're talking about buying Weight Watchers and Lean Cuisine it's cheaper. Vegetables are cheap and if you go to a farmer's market you can buy a weeks worth for $15-$20. Is it as easy as popping a microwave dinner in for 3 minutes or swinging by McDonald's? Of course not. That makes it less convient not more expensive. I'm guilty of this myself so I'm not pointing fingers. I'm just saying it doesn't cost more to eat healthy, it does however, require us to be more involved in our food choices and for most people the laziness factor wins out. As for kids eating poorly, that's on the parents. If your kids eat garbage, it's because you let them.


I somewhat agree. I live by myself, and my weekly food is about $100, which is more than I thought when I started this, but before I started dieting, I was eating out most days of the week ranging from about $20-$60 dollars a meal, so I was spending a lot more.

The reason it's a lot is because of the fats and protein. Especially as I can eat one container of Greek yogurt a day (about 6 dollars each). Cheese, high quality eggs, oils, nuts, etc, all cost a lot. Although I spend about $20 at the farmers market for a week of abundant vegetables, I spend about $80 at the grocery store buying the non-veggie and fruit stuff. And that's eating 1200 calories a day. I can imagine that a family of 4 could easily spend about a grand a month on the same groceries for everyone. And that's if everyone wants to eat healthy, otherwise you'd have to buy double the groceries to suit the rest of the family.

I could easily replace some of the dairy/meat proteins with beans/lentils to lower my grocery bill, but I like eating what tastes best to me, especially when I'm eating at a lower caloric intake.

I have always preached that eating healthy saves you money, but I also don't live with anyone else, which I'm sure is a different experience. I do know that because I do eat only healthy food, I have almost zero cravings and therefore don't impulse shop at all anymore, which I think has saved me a ton of money. Also, being uncomfortable with eating preprepared foods has lowered the cost a bit. On the other hand, I do prefer higher quality ingredients, which then jacks up the price. So it's kind of a toss-up, to me anyways.
datadoll

Joined: Jun 10
Posts: 196

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 13:21
I wonder about a correlation of the lack of ambition to change relates to both obesity and poverty.

In saying that, I am not pointing fingers. I am thinking about my own life situation. Although I have often tried to make the change between being fat and thin, I have lacked the ambition to complete the change. My personality is one that is perfectly happy with the way things are until they are extremely out of whack. Financially, I am the same way. I am not money motivated. Although I am not living in poverty, I am not wealthy either. I prefer doing what I like, spending my days leisurely moving from one thing to another as the wind blows rather than keeping my nose to grindstone and bringing home additional income.

Am I expaining this in a way that shows the correlation in my personality? Can that correlation be taken a step further into a society rather than just a personality? Dare I go a step further? Can you see that correlation in our society as it relates to not only obesity and poverty but also in the US to the voters attitudes and willingness to participate in our government and politics? And if I have not offended enough people by now, just one more thing, intended only to the ears of people claiming a life dedicated to a religion. Are you living it? Just some things to think about.
datadoll
There's no such thing as cheating, only choices! NO EXCUSES

The best diet is the one you can stick with.
Phule

Joined: Jun 10
Posts: 183

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 13:23
erin74kr wrote:

The reason it's a lot is because of the fats and protein. Especially as I can eat one container of Greek yogurt a day (about 6 dollars each). Cheese, high quality eggs, oils, nuts, etc, all cost a lot. Although I spend about $20 at the farmers market for a week of abundant vegetables, I spend about $80 at the grocery store buying the non-veggie and fruit stuff. And that's eating 1200 calories a day. I can imagine that a family of 4 could easily spend about a grand a month on the same groceries for everyone. And that's if everyone wants to eat healthy, otherwise you'd have to buy double the groceries to suit the rest of the family.

I could easily replace some of the dairy/meat proteins with beans/lentils to lower my grocery bill, but I like eating what tastes best to me, especially when I'm eating at a lower caloric intake.

I have always preached that eating healthy saves you money, but I also don't live with anyone else, which I'm sure is a different experience. I do know that because I do eat only healthy food, I have almost zero cravings and therefore don't impulse shop at all anymore, which I think has saved me a ton of money. Also, being uncomfortable with eating preprepared foods has lowered the cost a bit. On the other hand, I do prefer higher quality ingredients, which then jacks up the price. So it's kind of a toss-up, to me anyways.


I see what you're saying here erin, however, the point is that it can be done on a budget. A family doesn't have to have the highest quality meats or Greek yogurt etc... they just have to have a balanced diet. I grew up extremely poor by American standards. $12,000 a year for a family of 5... You get you veggies cheap then to buy poor cuts of meat and learn to cook them well! Also, you don't buy soda or any of that garbage. You drink... WATER and Milk with breakfast. A family is not a democracy either. My mom ruled our family, especially what we ate with an Iron Hand. We ate what she cooked or we did without. The problem I see today is that people choose to take the easy fast food and think that children should decide what they eat! They are children, we don't let them vote, smoke, drink or drive, why on Earth would we let them make their own nutritional decisions? Shock
Wintergirl

Joined: Oct 09
Posts: 67

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 13:25
I disagree that not having money to eat would mean eating less therefore you would be smaller. I have a friend & a family member that have children and they work, but still get food stamps for food because they make so little. They infact are over weight because they can only afford to feed themselves and their families CRAP. Mac n' cheese, rice, potatoes and so on. Stuff that is not healthy but cheap. Maybe people who have NEVER been poor can't relate. Unless you have been put in that position you don't really know what you would do. If it means eating CRAP or starving, I bet money most people are eating the CRAP. It's very easy to say what you would do in a situation that you have never been in and know nothing about. Oh but wait, alot of you aren't poverty stricken and CAN afford to buy the healthiest of foods, YET here you are, overweight yourself and even though alot of us can afford to eat healthy, we simply DON'T. It is a matter of choice for us, some people do not have a choice, it's eat what you can or STARVE. It's feed your kids what you can afford to feed them or just let them STARVE. So I can very well understand the plite of someone who honestly can't afford to buy heathly. May you never know what it's like to be in that kind of monetary situation yourself. But if you do, please come back to share with us how easy it was for you to starve yourself of your children just because it was better for you/them to NOT eat than to eat something unhealthy. Some people have to feed a family of 3 or 4 on say $25 a week because they have to pay rent & utilties and so on. I don't care who you are, you are not feeding anyone, not even 1 person anything close to healthy on that kind of money a month. Sometimes yes, people choose to spend money on other things and yes sometimes it is a matter of choice. You try to feed a family of 4 on $100 a week and they are not eating healthy for breakfast, lunch & dinner.
I was angered, for I had no shoes. Then I met a man who had no feet. Chinese Proverb

JizzEms

Joined: Jan 10
Posts: 19

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 13:29
Phule wrote:
I have to disagree that eating healthier costs more. Unless you're talking about buying Weight Watchers and Lean Cuisine it's cheaper. Vegetables are cheap and if you go to a farmer's market you can buy a weeks worth for $15-$20. Is it as easy as popping a microwave dinner in for 3 minutes or swinging by McDonald's? Of course not. That makes it less convient not more expensive. I'm guilty of this myself so I'm not pointing fingers. I'm just saying it doesn't cost more to eat healthy, it does however, require us to be more involved in our food choices and for most people the laziness factor wins out. As for kids eating poorly, that's on the parents. If your kids eat garbage, it's because you let them.


Agreed, and I dislike it when people say eating healthy is expensive. Think about it in terms of healthcare costs, and you'll likely change your mind. You know what's expensive? Insulin for diabetes, medication for coronary artery disease, or the invoice from Aetna for your bypass surgery. Not to mention obesity makes healthcare more costly for everybody, not just you.
I like to think there's a special place in Hell for picky eaters.
Phule

Joined: Jun 10
Posts: 183

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 13:31
Wintergirl wrote:
I disagree that not having money to eat would mean eating less therefore you would be smaller. I have a friend & a family member that have children and they work, but still get food stamps for food because they make so little. They infact are over weight because they can only afford to feed themselves and their families CRAP. Mac n' cheese, rice, potatoes and so on. Stuff that is not healthy but cheap. Maybe people who have NEVER been poor can't relate. Unless you have been put in that position you don't really know what you would do. If it means eating CRAP or starving, I bet money most people are eating the CRAP. It's very easy to say what you would do in a situation that you have never been in and know nothing about. Oh but wait, alot of you aren't poverty stricken and CAN afford to buy the healthiest of foods, YET here you are, overweight yourself and even though alot of us can afford to eat healthy, we simply DON'T. It is a matter of choice for us, some people do not have a choice, it's eat what you can or STARVE. It's feed your kids what you can afford to feed them or just let them STARVE. So I can very well understand the plite of someone who honestly can't afford to buy heathly. May you never know what it's like to be in that kind of monetary situation yourself. But if you do, please come back to share with us how easy it was for you to starve yourself of your children just because it was better for you/them to NOT eat than to eat something unhealthy.


NOT TRUE. I grew up in a family of 5 with an income of $12,000 a year. We got government cheese, dehydrated milk, and generic free peanut butter. We did not buy the crap food. We ate veggies and poor cuts of meat. We didn't get soda, microwave dinner or pizzas. McDonald's was what you got on your Birthday and never in between. I lived it. I'm not guessing. It's possible but you have to work at it and most Americans are LAZY. I think datadoll summed it up and to paraphrase her... it's a matter of apathy not poverty.
runnette

Joined: Jul 10
Posts: 65

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 13:43
On the topic of the cost/availability of healthy foods in poor neighborhoods ... there are many communities across the US that are creating urban farms. Growing veggies right in the city, maintained by the community. I know it requires a whole bunch of things to fall in place at the same time (space for the garden, permits, people who want to maintain it, just to name a few), but once one is started, that provides a lot of homegrown vegetables at low cost, compared to what it would take to get the same quality brought in.

Having said that, I never grew up in poverty, and there is a lot that I don't know about that. But it seems to me that strength comes with numbers, and together, I wonder if a community couldn't maintain their own farm given the right conditions ... ? Certainly, it would take commitment to action v. apathy, etc. and other things people have mentioned above.
~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Live a life less ordinary; live a live extraordinary. - Carbon Leaf
jessie1326

Joined: Feb 10
Posts: 271

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 13:43
You know, I see lazy and apathetic people all over the country, and by the same token I see motivated and passionate people all over the country. Speaking purely as a matter of social science observation, if laziness and apathy alone accounted for the obesity rates, I would expect to see a fairly uniform distribution of obesity around the country. Instead, a very clear pattern emerges in the maps shown. Correlation does not imply causation, but it's a heck of a coincidence that the obesity rates are clearly heavily concentrated in poorer, more rural (and generally less educated) states.
Wintergirl

Joined: Oct 09
Posts: 67

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 13:52
Since alot of you, NOT all, feel that it's easy to eat healthy on a poverty level budget, I challange you to try it and see how it works out for you. I would bet that most of you wouldn't last very long. And maybe what once was however many years ago when you were a child growing up in a poverty level, is no longer. I also grew up in a poverty level home. I lived in what some would now call the projects (government housing) and we ate what my mom put on the table, like it or not. I think alot of families still eat what is put on the table, especially if its a matter of eating or going hungery. Its easy to say people are lazy and blah blah.... fact is if you have NO/little money for food, you have to eat what you can feed a family on. Again, disagree all you want, but YOU go out and even try to feed yourself for a week, healthy foods, breakfast, lunch & dinner for $25 a week. You won't do it because you can't. So maybe try to put yourself in the place of someone that has to make that feed 4 people a week and not say its just because they are lazy. Yes maybe most people are lazy, that has nothing to do with the fact that they may have lost their job in this economy or the fact that they just do not make alot of money. Maybe it really is a matter of EAT vs. STARVE your children.
I was angered, for I had no shoes. Then I met a man who had no feet. Chinese Proverb

datadoll

Joined: Jun 10
Posts: 196

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Posted: 05 Aug 2010, 13:53
jessie1326 wrote:
You know, I see lazy and apathetic people all over the country, and by the same token I see motivated and passionate people all over the country. Speaking purely as a matter of social science observation, if laziness and apathy alone accounted for the obesity rates, I would expect to see a fairly uniform distribution of obesity around the country. Instead, a very clear pattern emerges in the maps shown. Correlation does not imply causation, but it's a heck of a coincidence that the obesity rates are clearly heavily concentrated in poorer, more rural (and generally less educated) states.

Even within cities. I think by just opening your eyes, you will see in the poorer areas of town the evidence. I have been watching here, and I am not in a large city. But in the places that are frequented by higher income people compared to those frequented by lower income people, it is a obvious as the nose on my face.
datadoll
There's no such thing as cheating, only choices! NO EXCUSES

The best diet is the one you can stick with.



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