CARBS PROTIEN SALT SUGAR

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MikeyD62

Joined: Sep 10
Posts: 2

      quote  
Posted: 05 Jun 2016, 17:53
How do you know how much of each is right or right for you?
Confused Confused Confused Confused
rabbitjb

Joined: Mar 16
Posts: 219

      quote  
Posted: 06 Jun 2016, 04:54
Just focus on your calories

Set your protein at 0.65 - 0.8g protein per lb bodyweight (at desired bodyweight) at a minimum
Set your fats at 0.35g per lb bodyweight at a minimum
Eat carbs to taste

Eat a wide nutritious diet - lots of brightly coloured vegetables, proteins, wide range of foods

If you find there's a food you find it difficult to moderate consider temporary elimination

if you don't have blood pressure issues don't worry unduly about salt

don't worry about sugar either unless you have specific medical condition - it's the fact that highly tasty foods tend to have high sugar / high fat and hence high calories that is the issue with weight maintenance and not the sugar per se


sort your calories and then focus on the minutiae
an00bis

Joined: Jun 10
Posts: 647

      quote  
Posted: 09 Jun 2016, 04:18
rabbitjb wrote:
Just focus on your calories

Set your protein at 0.65 - 0.8g protein per lb bodyweight (at desired bodyweight) at a minimum
Set your fats at 0.35g per lb bodyweight at a minimum
Eat carbs to taste

Eat a wide nutritious diet - lots of brightly coloured vegetables, proteins, wide range of foods

If you find there's a food you find it difficult to moderate consider temporary elimination

if you don't have blood pressure issues don't worry unduly about salt

don't worry about sugar either unless you have specific medical condition - it's the fact that highly tasty foods tend to have high sugar / high fat and hence high calories that is the issue with weight maintenance and not the sugar per se


sort your calories and then focus on the minutiae


These are great starting suggestions for most people.

To answer your question on how you know what's "ideal" for you; it depends on a number of factors.

Rabbitjb provided some information that's generally accepted as a solid easy-to-follow rule of thumb. You'll likely have great results for a long time if you stick to it. Technically, if you'd like to be more precise, your macro and micro nutrient requirements depend on your lean body mass, activity level, your goals, medical conditions, etc.

A highly athletic person that works out often needs more carbohydrates than a person that intends to lose weight without exercising (yes, it's possible). While I don't recommend it, if you wanted to lose weight regardless of where it comes from, you can quickly cut muscle by eating very little protein. In contrast, if you're looking to preserve muscle or even gain some, you'll need a higher amount of protein. Some people prefer ketogenic diets, and in those instances, more fat and less carbs will be key.

The general consensus on sodium is >1500 and <2400mg per day, but if you're lifting heavy weights and/or supplementing with something like creatine, more is actually better. Also, consider your lean body mass in comparison to the average person. If it's significantly higher or lower, this range should account for it.

Sugar comes in many forms. Carbohydrates are sugar. See my above statements on carbs.

Having said all that, I haven't really given you precise numbers. While I'm heavily biased towards certain schools of thought on the right macronutrient ratios (and I can post dozens of papers to back them up), there are just as many resources and people that will disagree with me.

As such, my biggest recommendation is for you to do your own research and consider what sources are more reputable and what makes the most sense given your own goals and strategy. There are plenty of faulty studies out there, so you'll have to really do some critical thinking and ignore a lot of "expert advice". You'll find tons of articles that still try to tell you "dietary fat is bad", but you'll just have to learn to ignore them.

If you think my post is too abrasive, harsh, or offensive, you're:
A) Wrong.
B) Too sensitive.
C) Not going to receive an apology for pointing it out.
karateorangu...

Joined: Jun 13
Posts: 16

      quote  
Posted: 09 Jun 2016, 07:32
All good posts.

You'll also find that as you learn to adjust your diet that you will see varying results when compared with other people. I know that for whatever reason that if I reduce my carbs below 210 g that I just feel miserable, and my workouts suffer becaues of it. This kind of knowledge comes with time and listening to how your body reacts to the nutrition that your getting.

Try to start with keeping your protein anywhere in the range that rabbitjb talked about and then move from there. Use a standard calculator online to get a quick answer and adjust as you progress.

At the outset though your caloric intake is going to tell the biggest tale.



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