So I'm poor....

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Tulipgirl6

Joined: Oct 13
Posts: 33

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Posted: 05 Jun 2014, 22:21
wholefoodnut wrote:
I also am on a limited budget. Just me one income. I eat lots of beans and legumes, luckily they are amazing!! Lots of ways to cook them from many cuisines. I eat lots of veggies, whole grains. even from whole foods you can stretch complementary proteins of whole grains and beans/legumes to be a good source of complete protein, usually the most expensive part of one's diet. lots of dark green and various colored veggies are great for you. lots of nutrition for not much $$$$.buy what's on sale or marked down. if you have any ethnic stores in the area you might want to see what they have available.


@wholefoodnut : how do you know what proteins complement each other? this is advanced stuff! and what if you don't have "whole" proteins? I think I need to look into this topic more!
HtownMedicin...

Joined: May 14
Posts: 39

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Posted: 05 Jun 2014, 22:35
Wish I could eat beans and lentils. They are so high in carbs that I am not allowed because they spike my blood sugar so much. Can't eat grains either, but more because of what they do to cause leaky gut as well as bloat me like balloon. I tell you what, when all you have is social security and nothing else, and then you can't eat what other people eat because it makes you sick, you are forced to figure out all the foods you can eat on a very small food budget. I went to an Asian market today and found pigs, chickens and ducks feet. Those will make a great bone broth for using in many other dishes and just drinking. Beans and grains are great together, but I'm trying to reverse my diabetes and those 2 foods are not good for me, darn it all!

Today was tuna, cherry tomatoes, green olives, chicken livers, cream cheese and pork rinds. At least it curbs the hunger. I do miss eating beans because I had some good recipes.
It is what it is, but it will become what you make it.
wholefoodnut

Joined: Jul 12
Posts: 1,159

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Posted: 06 Jun 2014, 04:18
With diabetes you certainly have to be careful of the carbs. Have a friend who thinks I have to follow her carb
counts for controlling hers, it's funny sometimes.

Enjoy the summer and the sunshine.

Jeri
wholefoodnut

Joined: Jul 12
Posts: 1,159

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Posted: 06 Jun 2014, 04:47
Tulipgirl, complementary proteins are pretty easy. There are only a few plants like soybeans that are complete proteins, animal meats are complete. By complete proteins it is meant that all of the amino acids that make protein usable in humans are present in the right proportion. Many plant foods only have some of them so there are combinations that provide them. As long as you eat an assortment in the same day your body will combine them. I wish I could draw a chart on here.

Foods to combine: grains plus beans/legumes; beans plus nuts/seeds: grains plus nuts/seeds; you can also combine dairy with grains, nut/seeds, or beans/legumes and complement the missing amino acid proportions.

That's it without getting into all the complicated food chemistry. There are also veggies that have quite a bit of protein as well that the usability can be increased by eating a varied diet, kale is one of the highest.

FS food tracker does not calculate the increase in protein usability so like on my tracker my meatless meals won't show the real proteins provided. Hope this helps make sense out of it.

Enjoy the summer and the sunshine.

Jeri
wholefoodnut

Joined: Jul 12
Posts: 1,159

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Posted: 06 Jun 2014, 05:13
Deb, I usually make my yogurt as well. Need to get some started this weekend, have to remember to buy some skim milk. Use an old 1970's yogurt maker. I bought it new then, still works great.

Enjoy the summer and the sunshine.

Jeri
Tulipgirl6

Joined: Oct 13
Posts: 33

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Posted: 06 Jun 2014, 06:28
Thanks for simplifying it for me! I also don't eat much beans and legumes; gotta get rid of my big belly! I thought they are good for diabetes as they reduce insulin spikes???
wholefoodnut

Joined: Jul 12
Posts: 1,159

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Posted: 06 Jun 2014, 08:45
YW..I'm not sure about the insulin spikes. Not a diabetic. I do know you have to control your carbs if you are diabetic and different people can handle differing amounts of carbs. Beans and legumes do have quite a few complex carbs.

Since low carb does not like my body; I've lost weight eating lots of complex carbs, veggies, and fruits with very little meat. Just watching my calories, not drinking much beer, and no junk foods.

Enjoy the summer and the sunshine.

Jeri
SuniGirl73

Joined: Jun 14
Posts: 5

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Posted: 06 Jun 2014, 20:03
I personally think it is pretty close to the same thing if you use the non fat or even low fat. The carbs seem to change in the culturing process. I have made kefir and if you let it set for too long the only thing you will see is whey. It's like the bacterium eats away at it until there is nothing. And I have made yogurt were I experimented with the cooling process. It seems to me that if you rapidly cool it at the setting the process the texture is thinner. Another time I waited till it seemed almost there and let it cool down in the water bath and it turn more thick and custard like. And don't worry I think I've made some of the best batches from plain store bought, I just look at the date to see how old it is.Smile
kenni_z

Joined: Jun 14
Posts: 34

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Posted: 06 Jun 2014, 20:22
eKatherine wrote:
You can eat well on a budget if you're willing and able to shop and cook everything from scratch. People who don't know how to cook, don't live near good supermarkets, and work multiple jobs don't stand a chance of eating healthy.


I'm going to have to agree with Carly70. I could get by on much less money if I ate exclusively from fast food dollar menus. Plus, cooking presupposes that you have already purchased a lot: pots and pans, salt, pepper, other basic seasonings, oils, non-stick spray. I realized that there's a lot of start-up capital involved in cooking when I moved out of my house with its fully stocked kitchen and into a dorm. Neutral
Kenni Z.
kenni_z

Joined: Jun 14
Posts: 34

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Posted: 06 Jun 2014, 20:28
I must say that I'm loving this discussion, everyone! Draglist is right. Poverty leads to obesity. This wasn't always the case, though. However, with the recent commodification of health, if you want to be trendy, then you eat kale and spinach and cook with olive oil and buy (supposedly) less processed food in uber-chic minimalist packaging. (I'm looking at you, Kashi!)
Kenni Z.
LuC2

Joined: Mar 11
Posts: 102

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Posted: 06 Jun 2014, 20:54
I'm amazed by how much produce can cost. I mean, pound-for-pound it's still much less expensive than processed foods, but "tough" kale and mustard greens or strange-shaped mirlitons (chayote) were poor people's food that the rich passed up! (Anybody priced out Osso Bucco these days? Amazing...it's peasant food...sheesh!)

I am so grateful to have learned to cook with a grandmother and an even older godmother (with a garden). The ONLY way to (somewhat) get around the commercialization and industrialization of our food supply is to cook. Forget you, Kashi! I will buy oats, pepitas, coconut oil and turbinado to bake my own preservative-free cereals. I agree poverty does breed obesity and vice versa because obese people can have mobility or health challenges that keep them poor. A vicious cycle.

KENNI_Z, I've definitely been where you are. My suggestion, find the nearest IKEA for a low-budget, heavy set of pots and then start stacking your pantry a little at a time. If you've got a non-cooking friend, they may be willing to split costs with you on pots and basics to share in the weekly bounty. (I was a rare pearl to my non-cooking friends back in my college dorm many-many-ummmm-many years ago)!

LuC2's Height: 5'2" | Starting Weight: 303 lbs | Total Loss-to-Date: -20 lbs
HtownMedicin...

Joined: May 14
Posts: 39

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Posted: 06 Jun 2014, 21:22
I have been cooking since I was 18 and out on my own, with the advice of my mother when I wanted to know how to cook something she had made when I was lving at home. A southern cook from Alabama, my mother was a fabulous cook, but what she cooked wasn't all that healthy. However, what it gave me was the groundwork to cook from scratch.
I worked a full time job and raised a daughter alone while managing to cook our dinners from scratch. I would cook enough at the beginning of the week so we could eat off a meal 2 or 3 times. I still cook from scratch and enjoy the hell out of it. I hated cooking when I first started, but the more I did it, the easier it got and the better I got at it. Now I enjoy cooking when I feel like it.
Tonight I roasted cornish hens and had tomatoes for dinner. Hens were basted with a butter/olive oil mix, lemon juice, garlic, rosemary, salt and pepper. Stuffed some rosemary finely chopped under the skin. I grated the rind off the lemons and after juicing the lemons, I stuffed half of each inside the cavity of the birds. Then I topped the birds with a light sprinkling of smoked paprika. That was a satisfying dinner!! The cornish hens cost me $7.48 and will make 3 meals for me.
It is what it is, but it will become what you make it.
Deb_N

Joined: Nov 13
Posts: 322

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Posted: 06 Jun 2014, 21:55
LuC2, that Osso Bucco, which is expensive these days, used to be the cheapest meat we could buy. That peasant food was called shank meat. I made many a stew [with lots of vegetables] from those shanks and saved the bones to make soup. Smile
________________________________
Woohoo! I am excited! Love this website!
LuC2

Joined: Mar 11
Posts: 102

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Posted: 06 Jun 2014, 22:11
Exactly...veal shanks really not affordable these days except for a special meal! Sometimes I have sticker shock in the grocery when I remember what grew freely (or was shared freely) among neighbors. Having a limited budget AND not being a decent cook is a recipe for disaster for fitness and wellness. One thing I liked about Paula Deen was her country, recognizable food. I ignored all the butter -- because I knew enough about cooking to do so -- but seeing cabbage cooked on tv or bean soup was unusual. There's very little real cooking or real food showing up on Food Network these days...to me anyway (Ohhh, except for my girl, Anne Burrell). Aside from my family, I learned to perfect some techniques watching PBS -- Julia Child, Jacques Pepin, Emeril Lagasse (before he BAMMED his way into history), Paul Prudhomme, Jeff Smith (Frugal Gourmet), Martin Yan ("Hot wok and cold oil mean food won't stick"Wink, Justin Wilson (Cajun Country); and later Lidia Bastianich and Rick Bayless. I learned my lessons well and have the hips to prove it! (LOL)

LuC2's Height: 5'2" | Starting Weight: 303 lbs | Total Loss-to-Date: -20 lbs
wholefoodnut

Joined: Jul 12
Posts: 1,159

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Posted: 07 Jun 2014, 07:53
I have to do some shopping for the week tomorrow so will keep track of what I spend. I do buy frozen fish by the case when restaurant depot has it on sale, usually under $2.50per pound and my son in law keeps me in fresh caught catfish which do freeze in small packages. I also have a very well stacked pantry as I pick up staples when they are on sale. I average at about $30.00 per week for food for just me. I do eat well. I love to cook and experiment with different types of foods.

Beans, legumes, grains, some seeds are always stocked. I do need to get sesame and flax seeds this week.

I never buy those designer packaged stuff though the chayotes come wrapped individually as that's how the Mexican store gets them Smile).

Enjoy the summer and the sunshine.

Jeri
wholefoodnut

Joined: Jul 12
Posts: 1,159

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Posted: 07 Jun 2014, 08:05
Defiantly agree with draglist that companies don't profit much from those of us who cook and eat closer to the earth. I agree with Luc2 there are many chefs that you can learn cooking basics from, either from their shows or from books.

Just a few as I have hundreds of cookbooks. I love my Julia Childs books, I use her method of cooking beans, Marcella Kazan's Italian cookbooks are amazing, Barbara Kafka's roasting book is a fav, I still need mark brittman's and rick bayless' books though I check them out from the library. I also have several old cookbooks that are go to's. For grain's my "laurel's kitchen" and "vegetarian planet.".

Enjoy the summer and the sunshine.

Jeri
kenni_z

Joined: Jun 14
Posts: 34

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Posted: 07 Jun 2014, 10:00
Luc2, I learned all my cooking skills from my mother and grandmother. and they know a thing or two about stretching a dollar. And wholefoodnut, I also like to pick up staples when they're on sale. A different seasoning every week, or so. Eating on a budget is tough but everyone's giving me great advice! Thanks Smile
Kenni Z.
wholefoodnut

Joined: Jul 12
Posts: 1,159

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Posted: 07 Jun 2014, 11:21
It is tough sometimes especially with food prices. I find planning my best ally. If I don't plan I waste food.

I rebel at spending $$$ on red meat because it is so expensive. I also have friends who raise cattle and hogs (no longer nearby but keep in touch)and know they are not the ones who reap much of the profits. They try hard to raise animals with the best natural feed etc. Then they are sold and often sent to feed lots to fatten without the natural grass and feed they were raised on. I'm no longer in a position to buy an animal direct from them and butcher them like my ex and I used to do.

Enjoy the summer and the sunshine.

Jeri
Hope4Health

Joined: Feb 11
Posts: 95

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Posted: 07 Jun 2014, 12:52
What drives me crazy is many government spokespeople keep talking about the low inflation rate, whereas we've seen groceries go up so much in the past few years!
wholefoodnut

Joined: Jul 12
Posts: 1,159

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Posted: 07 Jun 2014, 12:59
I also don't get it! Food, energy, clothing, medical care all the necessary things for life keep going up, so do taxes and insurance.

Enjoy the summer and the sunshine.

Jeri



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