2 PAGES
1 | 2
previous topic · next topic
kacap

Joined: Jan 12
Posts: 1

      quote  
Posted: 18 Apr 2014, 08:23
I am so addicted to sugar. I am trying to get off of it. I saw on Dr. Oz that you have to do it cold turkey. I started yesterday. I did not have any yesterday! Big success. I think today will be harder. I need all the encouragement I can get.

I also need to not eat at night! UGH I hate the habits that are the hardest to break.

Have a great Easter everyone!
Draglist

Joined: Jun 12
Posts: 740

      quote  
Posted: 18 Apr 2014, 08:55
The first one is more important than the second one. In addition to the obvious sugar in things you eat, be careful to read nutrition labels to find instances of added sugar and too-high carbohydrates. Wishing you much success!
Hoser

Joined: Jul 10
Posts: 2,052

      quote  
Posted: 18 Apr 2014, 09:34
There's nothing wrong with eating at night as long as you plan for it. Make sure you have healthy snacks lined up for nighttime munching.
Glaun

Joined: Jun 13
Posts: 568

      quote  
Posted: 18 Apr 2014, 10:03
My sugar addiction was so bad that I used to hide candy, pastries etc. around the house so they wouldn't be traced to me. And what's worse, I lived alone.
I found that if I did eat refined sugar, that by following it up with some pure orange or apple juice, or by eating a small bit of raw fruit I could quell the sugar cravings.
Eventually, I was able to wean myself off refined sugars, but it was hard and I have to be ever vigilant against downing more.

The Perfect Speed
"any number is a limit, and perfection doesn't have limits.
Perfect speed, my son, is being there.”
Chiang from "Jonathan Livingston Seagull
pioneermom

Joined: Apr 14
Posts: 5

      quote  
Posted: 18 Apr 2014, 21:15
If you ever figure it out, please let me know. I am finding that I wake up with a high level of motivation that continues until about 4:00 pm and then my sugar/carbohydrate cravings really intensify. Some days I stay strong and on track, but many days I do not. A friend of mine struggled with sugar cravings and food urges so overwhelming in the evening that she went to bed at 6:00 for an entire week because the only way not to eat was to not be conscious! This is no silly little addiction. Sugar cravings are powerful and real and almost impossible to control for the addict and I completely empathize with you. If I didn't have a young child I have to take care of, I would follow in my friend's footsteps and go to bed early, too, just to avoid having to deal with the depressing battle of my food weaknesses.
DonFecteau

Joined: Aug 10
Posts: 6

      quote  
Posted: 18 Apr 2014, 22:43
Try eating something every 3 to 3.5 hours and always eat some form of protein each time along with complex carbs (fruits, veggies, grains)

If you skip meals or go too long between meals or snacks your blood sugar will go below normal range - that will trigger almost uncontrollable sweets and junk food cravings - which will cause your blood sugar to go too high and you will be on a roller coaster all day. Breakfast within 45 mins of waking up - add mid morning and mid afternoon snack between breakfast and lunch and lunch and dinner. No cookies, chips or junk - fruit, cheese, yogurt, hard boiled egg - stuff like that for snacks - you'll probably feel a lot better
Don Fecteau
Herbalife Independent Distributor
Wellness Coach
Lauderhill FL 33319
856-745-5939
mummydee

Joined: Feb 10
Posts: 2,181

      quote  
Posted: 19 Apr 2014, 03:35
Sugar.... the heroin of the food industry. and they are only in it for one thing $$$$$ they and the fda don't give a hoot about your health, it's all big bucks.

http://www.collective-evolution.com/2013/10/14/sugar-is-addictive-one-of-the-most-dangerous-substances-we-consume/

and have a glance at this that came out in the 50's... the government had a choice Fat or Sugar and they chose to take the scientific studies that said fat is bad, fat is the enemy and sugar is good. Look where that thinking got us.... now they are doing a turn about and the fat that was shunned for so long is now being touted as okay..

http://www.amazon.com/Pure-White-Deadly-Problem-Sugar/dp/0706700406
farmerblue

Joined: Apr 14
Posts: 7

      quote  
Posted: 23 Apr 2014, 08:31
Agreed! Sugar is the bane of weight and unhealthy eatting (is sooooo addictive) it feels like what i think drug withdrawals might feel like when you go cold turkey.
gnat824

Joined: Jul 10
Posts: 1,695

      quote  
Posted: 23 Apr 2014, 09:45
There is nothing inherently evil about sugar and I think a lot of the alarmist school goes way too far and shows that it's just misunderstood. Sugar is the most readily available form of energy for your body. If you're running a race and need to replenish your energy stores quickly, that's a GOOD thing. If you're trying to lose weight, the fact that it's a pure source of energy is not such a good thing because you won't burn the calories as quickly as you metabolize them it doesn't deliver the other nutrients you need with your reduced food consumption. People call it an addiction because it's true that our bodies are hardwired to seek out sugar. Sugar is relatively rare in nature and when our ancestors found a source, it was to their benefit to exploit the easily accessible energy it provided. In our modern world where we've mastered the art of generating sugar, this clearly poses a problem.

DonFecteau raises and excellent point about making sure you're eating regularly- when you get hungry and your blood sugar drops, it is perfectly natural for your body to crave a form of energy that it will be able to access immediately!

Most of us need to cut back on sugar, this is true. But I disagree that it has to be done cold turkey. Over the course of the last few years, I've curbed my sweet tooth quite a bit without needing to cut it from my diet. You should also be consuming sugar as part of a balanced meal so that the delivery of the energy from your food will be staggered as it breaks down- simple sugars first, followed by the more complex ones and other calories. The complex carbs, proteins and fats that take longer to break down will be what helps you to sustain your energy levels (blood sugar) until your nest meal.

Some people do have more serious metabolic issues or something that actually does resemble more of an addiction- but if that's the case, you should probably be working with someone who knows what they're talking about rather than relying on pop science books.


- Natalie
corifeo

Joined: Nov 13
Posts: 255

      quote  
Posted: 23 Apr 2014, 12:33
I don’t think I would call sugar addictive I think you would have to expand the meaning of that word until even my wife would full in that category of addictive… Maybe she is.
Kris AZ

Joined: Feb 14
Posts: 74

      quote  
Posted: 23 Apr 2014, 13:29
People who are addicted to refined sugars call it addictive because it is addictive to their bodies as it is to mine. I don't know why people have to say its not true to others on here who say they are addicted. I spent 30 days in a food addiction treatment center which included a food plan with no refined flour or sugar. It started day 1, cold turkey, and no one had any ill effects from not eating refined sugar. In fact, we all talked about feeling better and more clear to deal with other issues. There was also an alcohol addiction wing in this hospital filled with doctors and nurses. I find it maddening that people are so easy to tell others what they believe or are doing is wrong. I cut refined sugar and flour out completely. My body doesn't need refined sugars. Maybe some people don't believe it but that doesn't give them the right to tell someone they are wrong on what a true addiction is. ad·dic·tion: 1) a strong and harmful need to regularly have something (such as alcohol or a drug) or do something (such as gamble) 2) an unusually great interest in something or a need to do or have something. Also, Overeaters Anonymous is a big proponent of staying away from refined sugars and flours. I don't see how hospital treatment centers and a major Anonymous program knowing people can be addicted to refined sugars can be considered pop science.
Kris

There but for the Grace of God go I.

Don't stop believin'.... Hold on to that feelin'....

"Sweat is fat crying"

"Everytime you eat or drink you are either feeding disease or fighting it"
iheartproduc...

Joined: Apr 14
Posts: 5

      quote  
Posted: 23 Apr 2014, 15:53
I felt addicted to sugar for decades. I lied and stoled to get my next fix of candy, it was that bad. What got me out of that bad habit was eating lots of fruit. Now I can have candy in moderation. Good luck to you!
mummydee

Joined: Feb 10
Posts: 2,181

      quote  
Posted: 23 Apr 2014, 17:52
Cold turkey is definitely the only way to go for some people. With us all being humans we are all different and just as an alcoholic or drug addict cannot slowly stop their addiction, neither can a sugar addict. You cannot have just one drink or one hit, it doesn't work for an addictive type personality.
What might be different with a food addict is that eventually after a certain time period and education you will be able to have that one 'treat'and not go back to your old habits.

I have been studying nutrition since the 70's and have seen so many diets, fads and eating plans and propoganda put out there that eventually you sit back and decide for yourself using common sense , just what is good and right for you.
pioneermom

Joined: Apr 14
Posts: 5

      quote  
Posted: 23 Apr 2014, 18:40
There is no doubt in my mind that sugar is addictive. However, I am not so absurd as to claim that this addiction is physical. If I quit tomorrow, I wouldn't have DT's or have to go into a hospital to get through it. However, we are more than just bodies and addiction has a psychological/emotional component that I think is what sugar "addicts" experience. Obsessive thoughts (to the point of ruminating), lying about consumption ("I threw the rest of the cookies down the garbage disposal", aka--the garbage disposal of my stomach!), hiding/sneaking/dishonest behaviors (picking all the good stuff out of my kids' Easter baskets and denying it, hiding in the bathroom with the shower running to eat a bag of M & M's or half a box of cinnamon rolls), compulsive behaviors (not being able to wait for my sugar hit until I got home and eating cake in the grocery store parking lot with my fingers). I know this is disgusting and probably TMI, but if anyone does not think this is classic addictive behavior, I don't know what is. Sugar gives me a hit of pleasure so intense that I would literally do almost anything to get it no matter what damage it causes me or what the potential consequences are. I don't like alcohol and don't drink. I smoked a pack a day of Marlboro's from ages 21-26 and quit cold turkey the day my future husband told me he wouldn't marry a smoker (and never missed it). So, I think that what I am grappling with with refined sugar/carbs is something that I would have quit YEARS ago if I really could have without this crushing compulsion. Why on earth would I have let myself get to 165 pounds instead of stopping at 130 if I had any margin of emotional control over this? I am going to stop now because I am starting to sound strident even to myself. Nuff said, that's just my 2 cents worth. God bless all fellow sugar strugglers!
mummydee

Joined: Feb 10
Posts: 2,181

      quote  
Posted: 23 Apr 2014, 18:53
So true pioneermom basically that's the same as cocaine addiction. You don't have physical withdrawals like with heroin, it's a mental addiction but just because its only psychological it makes it no less of an addiction.
corifeo

Joined: Nov 13
Posts: 255

      quote  
Posted: 23 Apr 2014, 19:39
I know people have strong feeling about this topic but I truly believe that only better education can help people combat there problem with weight.
Take the time and read the scientific literature on this topic with an open mind.

The plausibility of sugar addiction and its role in obesity and eating disorders

http://www.iedar.es/pdf/informes/sobrepeso/The-plausibility-of-sugar-addiction-its-role-in-obesity-and-eating-disorders.pdf

JasminEmeral...

Joined: Nov 11
Posts: 69

      quote  
Posted: 23 Apr 2014, 19:58
I had pretty serious sugar withdrawal symptoms. Chronic migraines, lethargy, decreased immunity, stomach cramps... and other less obvious stuff like a poor attention span.
It started when i began intermittent fasting, because when i ate, it was only very low sugar meals, and no processed sugar at all.
Took about 3 days to get over it.
I was pretty hooked on sweets, so a radical change was obviously going to have a radical effect.

Now i still have sweets, but not nearly as often or as much.
I recommend starting by only cutting the processed sucrose. Keep the fructose and lactose as well as all complex carbohydrates (fruit, milk and starch), before you start to lower those. And don't try to substitute the "not-sugar" stuff like stevia, or diet sodas. it is still sugar, just more processed so our bodies don't handle it.

I believe it is an addiction, just more subtle than hardcore drugs.
But then, like any diet, it's about moderation, planning and restraint.
Kris AZ

Joined: Feb 14
Posts: 74

      quote  
Posted: 23 Apr 2014, 20:15
Anyone can find an article or paper stating what they think is correct. Me and my sugar addict friends will just keep believing our insane thoughts.
Kris

There but for the Grace of God go I.

Don't stop believin'.... Hold on to that feelin'....

"Sweat is fat crying"

"Everytime you eat or drink you are either feeding disease or fighting it"
mummydee

Joined: Feb 10
Posts: 2,181

      quote  
Posted: 23 Apr 2014, 21:05
So true Kris, and as I said, I've been studying/reading/ learning since the 70's... so many ''scientific studies'' are produced by the scientists working for the company that produces the product or paid off by the FDA or some other government body, I don't read them any more at all.

and even though the internet is a great place of learning, just because its on the internet does not make it true!! gasp!

Real sugar was in Europe centuries ago , only for the rich and consumed in minor quanitities, no problems. So study history and see where the problem started. High fructose corn syrup, and all the other 'oses' , malitol and all the other sugar alcohols, it's a very complex topic because it's basically approx. 60 years old and began with the advent of non foods supposedly to make life easier.
Ruhu

Joined: Sep 12
Posts: 548

      quote  
Posted: 24 Apr 2014, 17:09
I, too, consider myself addicted to sugar. I struggled for a long time trying to find a way of handling it, to finally get to the point of realization that giving up added sugar works best for me. I, too, hid it, snuck it, denied it, etc. I'm intolerant of gluten & lactose as well, and choose to think of having a sugar intolerance too. I've seen multiple articles saying that by restricting sugar or any food completely, just sets us up to overeat it or binge on it. But, for me, each time I'd try to eat sugar in moderation, I just wanted more & more. So for now, I choose to not eat it, but know that I can choose to have it again anytime, knowing what the consequences may be. Now, my sugar manta is that for me, one bite of sugar is too much and 100 bites not enough.
God grant me the serenity
to accept the things I cannot change;
courage to change the things I can;
and wisdom to know the difference.



Forum Search
Advanced forum search



Latest Posts

The recent approval from the FDA
I am living in my 30's therefore, it simply occurred to Maine at some point that bar is best than cure and thus, I visited my skin doctor for a diagnostic assay. Astonishingly, the take a look at ...
by vedretolrdjak on 27 Aug 14 05:39 AM
I don't know what to do
Welcome back Buttercup! It sounds like you've got some people who want to exert a lot of control over you. Hopefully once you get a good start going you'll gain momentum and be able to be a bit ...
by Vickie 5966 on 27 Aug 14 01:17 AM
DetERmiNAtiON
-Determination is not giving up.:d -Determination is not letting go. -Determination is not "this is not worth it" s##t. -Determination is falling on your face and getting back up. -Determ ...
by ChubbyJolka on 27 Aug 14 12:10 AM
Trying 1 more time
Right a permanent change is the only way to keep it off once you los it. Best is slow and develop a new way of eating healthier, add some exercise.
by wholefoodnut on 26 Aug 14 08:48 PM
Battle of the Sexes, Weight Loss Version
Whoever writes this article does not know anything about fitness, cardio burn more calories than strange training. You cannot build muscle mass on a deficit.
by corifeo on 26 Aug 14 08:38 PM