PORTION CONTROL & HUNGRY STILL(?)!!

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LISAMSV

Joined: Jan 14
Posts: 6

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Posted: 05 Apr 2014, 21:36
I AM FOLLOWING FAITHFULLY THE CHART ON THE FRIDGE: PICK A PROTEIN & A CARB,..., AND IT GIVES A LIST OF SOME. AS WELL AS A FEW PRE-PLANNED MEALS FOR EVERY MEAL AND SNACK FOR THE DAY. THE PROBLEM I'M HAVING IS IS THAT THE PORTIONS (FOOD MEASUREMENTS GIVEN) DO NOT ALWAYS FILL MY STOMACH UP....OFTEN STILL FEEL LIKE I NEED A LITTLE MORE TO NOT FEEL HUNGRY STILL. I DO ASK MYSELF, "IS IT HEAD HUNGER, HABIT HUNGER, OR REAL HUNGER?" THAT HELPS WITH LATE NIGHT SNACKS---BUT, NOT SO MUCH ALL THE TIME, ESPECIALLY DURING AFTERNOON THOUGH AFTER DINNER HOURS. TIPS? LISAMSV Smile
LisaMarieV.
HotMammaAOA

Joined: Sep 13
Posts: 25

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Posted: 09 Apr 2014, 13:38
A big glass of water or a cup of hot tea, then wait 30 minutes and see if you REALLY still fill hungry. If really still hungry after, eat a serving of veggies.
Hoser

Joined: Jul 10
Posts: 2,052

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Posted: 09 Apr 2014, 14:47
I recommend trying to incorporate lots of vegetables into as many meals as possible. When I look at your diet calendar I generally see only one serving of healthy, nutritious vegetables per day... if that. You should really be having several servings. If I were you I would cut back on things like bread and potatoes and focus more on nutritious food

Make friends with the produce section of your supermarket. It's just loaded with healthy, nutritious, low-calorie food that will fill you up. Here are some ideas.

- Steam some asparagus and top it with fresh-ground pepper and a light drizzle of high-quality balsamic vinegar. Ten spears of asparagus will come in at around 30 calories, and that's a lot of asparagus. Don't think you have time? You can do this in the microwave in two minutes flat.

- One cup of carrots is around 50 calories. Toss them with a tiny amount of olive oil and then roast them in the oven. (Google can tell you how best to do this.) Finish with pepper and chopped herbs.


- One cup of brussels sprouts is around 40 calories. I roast these in the oven too. I never liked them until I had them prepared well, and now my problem is that I can't stop at just one serving! Of all the things to be hooked on, brussels sprouts aren't so bad I guess.

- One cup of winter squash (butternut, acorn, etc.) is around 40 calories. Oven roasting once again... bet you didn't see that coming!

- One cup of spinach has 7 calories. Yes, seven! There are zillions of recipes for sauteed spinach out there, so I won't repeat them here.

- Kale, chard, and other leafy greens are similar to spinach.

- One cucumber has around 45 calories, Slice them up and make a simple dressing for them. A typical dressing would be a couple of tablespoons of cider vinegar or rice wine vinegar, about a teaspoon of oil (sesame works well), about half a teaspoon of sugar, and a small amount of salt.

- An entire head of cabbage comes in at around 200 calories. I made this recently, and it was insanely delicious: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Quick-Braised-Red-Cabbage-and-Apple-240268

- Bok choy has around 10 calories per cup. I tend to like Asian-influenced preparations for it.
Kris AZ

Joined: Feb 14
Posts: 74

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Posted: 09 Apr 2014, 15:05
awesome post Hoser! I got asparagus over the weekend and steamed it in the microwave. It was awesome. Veggies are where its at!
Kris

There but for the Grace of God go I.

Don't stop believin'.... Hold on to that feelin'....

"Sweat is fat crying"

"Everytime you eat or drink you are either feeding disease or fighting it"
cyd69

Joined: Jan 13
Posts: 60

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Posted: 09 Apr 2014, 15:27
I love eating my vegetables. I have a salad everyday for lunch and I rotate between steamed vegetables , 1 cup of pasta or 1 cup of potatoes for dinner. I have been really watching how much starches I am eating
myawethinTIC...

Joined: Sep 13
Posts: 149

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Posted: 09 Apr 2014, 16:42
KRIS,I'm adding your bottom line of your post signature to my collection of quotes & posting it on my fridge! LOVE it! Very Happy
We can not become who we want to be by remaining who we are.
Action follows Thought. Focus on the Efforts & the Results will come.
kattay

Joined: Feb 11
Posts: 37

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Posted: 09 Apr 2014, 17:59
Great post Hoser! I have also read it is best to stay away from flour completely, any kind of flour. This includes batters, sauces, etc. A lot of calories for no nutrition. Even whole wheat breads and pasta have a lot of calories and little nutrition. Wheat, corn, and other grains are GMO and best not eaten. Replace with other veggies. Potatoes are a high calorie starch that should be eaten seldom. If you aren't happy without starches, winter squash and sweet potatoes can provide more nutrition per calorie. Even someone on a low carb, high fat diet usually tries to pick the most nutritious veggies each day.
LuC2

Joined: Mar 11
Posts: 102

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Posted: 09 Apr 2014, 18:01
For snacks, I buy large containers of thick unsweetened Greek Yogurt and organic honey. (Add a touch of pure vanilla, and voila!)

Would also recommend baking homemade granola and parcelling out servings in snack-sized ziplocs. Very easy to do, makes a lot and shelf stable + easy add-in to yogurt.

You can make pita chips any flavor your like, also Stacy's Pita Chips are the tastiest I've found on the market. I invested in a mandolin which makes quick work of oven-baked potato, sweetpotato or other vegetable chips.

I also make hummus (pretty cheap when you make vs buy -- simply chickpeas and garlic...pretty much). Two cans of rinsed peas will get you through a couple of days. Great with pita chips or for low-carb, I'll dip fresh french green beans, cucumber or mini-carrots. Same with Mexican 7-Layer dip - buy fat free refried beans or mash your own homemade beans and layer with chopped tomato, green onions. black olives, etc. Also pile that 7-layer dip on dark lettuce leaves and makes a good lunch or dinner main course salad (esp with thinly sliced cooked chicken or beef).

Fresh fruit (in season) is quite inexpensive. Grapes are tasty frozen. Blueberries, strawberries also freeze well. Sliced mango/peaches/apricots and bananas (1-inch) chunks also freeze well and make great additions to smoothies or mashed into Greek Yogurt. Blend with a little super-cold coconut milk and you've got frozen yogurt! (Invest in a very powerful blender like NINJA).

And, yes, LIVE in the Produce Section of the store. Make time for a 10min walk through your grocer's produce section and see what's available this time of year and the cost. Then, come home and surf the web, mags (like Cooking Light and EatingWell), cookbooks, and even FatSecret to find recipes with those ingredients. Write the titles + location of those recipes on a blank calendar and fill in the calendar with other wholesome snack ideas, etc. From those recipes...NOW make a grocery list. This should keep you on the outer perimeter of the store and away from the goodies and packaged/processed foods in the center of the store. Try some Vegetarian entrees too! Lots of food (hearty portions) and much lower on calories than meats. I'll say it again, "EatingWell Diabetes Cookbook: Delicious Recipes and Tips for a Healthy-Carbohydrate Lifestyle" by Joyce Hendley (ISBN-13: 9780881507782) has an excellent guide for stocking a pantry and kitchen for healthy eating (with 'real' food). I'm not a diabetic (hubby is) but I found the book a great resource for just knowing what should be in my kitchen at all times!

Just a note, buying fresh produce means you'll probably need weekly store runs rather than the biweekly or monthly schedule many of us are on. I hope some of this will help you as it's helped me.

LuC2's Height: 5'2" | Starting Weight: 303 lbs | Total Loss-to-Date: -20 lbs
Hoser

Joined: Jul 10
Posts: 2,052

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Posted: 09 Apr 2014, 22:20
@kattay: I do not believe that there is currently any GMO wheat on the market. According to this Wikipedia page, "As of 2013, no GM wheat is grown commercially, but many field tests have been conducted."

I favor a more moderate approach toward flour and similar empty calories than you do. I don't avoid it completely, but I keep it to a minimum. It's rare for me to cook with flour these days, but I don't completely avoid it either. If I'm going out for a hamburger, then that burger is just going to have a bun. I try not to buy food products, so I avoid the whole high-fructose corn syrup/corn oil thing, but when corn is in season then I'm going to buy ears of it and eat it gleefully.

The poison is in the dose. There's a huge difference between a teaspoon of flour every now and then to make a sauce come together and a plate of pasta every day. It's like the difference between adding a teaspoon of sugar to a dish and drinking a can of Coke (14 teaspoons. Yuck!)
libertino85

Joined: Mar 14
Posts: 30

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Posted: 10 Apr 2014, 12:32
The other thing is that -ultimately- you, me, and many of us on this site who want to lose weight will simply have to live with being hungry from time to time. Hopefully, this does not sound too harsh. Getting used to being hungry has given me a little edge to losing weight. Also, keep in mind that just because we have hunger pangs does not mean that we have burned up all the calories from our last meal. It just means that our stomachs are empty. And, in my humble opinion, our stomachs do not need to be filled with food at all times of day. Again, this is just my opinion. Good luck and keep up the good work.
Hoser

Joined: Jul 10
Posts: 2,052

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Posted: 10 Apr 2014, 14:02
You know, I've been thinking about this for a couple of days and I've come to realize something.

Most Americans have a really skewed notion of what a portion size is. We're offered Big Gulps and supersized meals and double doubles and grand slam breakfasts and venti coffee drinks and four-serving "individual sized" bags of potato chips. We've come to see it as normal and reasonable to eat this much food at every meal, and that's largely because the processed food industry wants us to believe that they're normal.

(OK, the real reason is that we produce a huge surplus of calories, and they have to go somewhere. Processed food producers can't go out and find new American customers for their crap because they can't control population growth. Instead, they've tricked us into consuming a few hundred more calories every day, and they're happy to sell us those calories in oversized "regular size" packages.)

When I was growing up a large soda was 12 ounces and a regular was 8 ounces. The mound of fries that McDonalds gives you with a regular size order used to be their large size. Adults would often go to McDonalds and get a cheeseburger, a small fry, and a small drink-- today that's called a Happy Meal.

So yeah, you probably need to recalibrate yourself so that you recognize and enjoy normal portions sizes rather than gluttonous American ones. And yeah, that might suck for a little bit. You can make it easier on yourself if you eat foods that aren't very calorie-dense. Our language has a special word just to describe those foods-- we call them vegetables.
cyd69

Joined: Jan 13
Posts: 60

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Posted: 10 Apr 2014, 16:03
Yes you can eat a lot of vegetables cuz they are good for you
AlexChandra

Joined: Apr 11
Posts: 3

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Posted: 10 Apr 2014, 16:30
Lisa - you can just get out of the situation.. go out, talk to friend call someone, meet someone, listen to music, start a movie..

basically, distract your mind..

another (no so great) way is to think of things u hate.. bad smelling things.. ur hunger will say bye-bye to u..
kattay

Joined: Feb 11
Posts: 37

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Posted: 11 Apr 2014, 00:31
I did read that all wheat has been altered from its original state to be more insect resistant and for higher yields. Bottom line, in my case, I enjoy it too much. Eating bread or anything with flour in it just makes me want to eat more of it. I have too much weight to lose to mess with it right now lol.
mummydee

Joined: Feb 10
Posts: 2,265

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Posted: 11 Apr 2014, 15:13
Wheat has been altered for many many years. It's called 'selective breeding' Farmers will cross breed all kinds of wheat to make it bigger and better and a higher yield. but it is always Wheat.

GMO is not ... it is chemically altered and not natural.

That being said, Wheat is one of the biggest problems of our diet. So many with celiac disease and other bowel problems are all from wheat. and then on to the 'gluten' problem.. it's a tree with many branches.

I personally stay away from grains. If i do consume them I go for Spelt and kamut. Grains cause me to bloat and feel uncomfortable and gain weight so they're out for me.



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