question for exercise experts

previous topic · next topic
wholefoodnut

Joined: Jul 12
Posts: 1,436

      quote  
Posted: 02 Feb 2014, 13:07
My understanding from multiple physical therapy tx programs and reading that the circuit and weight machines should be used slowly and controlled using the complete rang of motion. Also the resistance of letting the weights down slowly is in most cases the most beneficial and pauses at the end of the range of motion. At the gym I see many people doing fast jerky reps. Am I right on my understanding?

"Its not enough for the food to just be nutritious. It must also be delicious, or eating will feel like a punishment." Meg Galvin, Smartpeople Cookbook.

Jeri
liafh

Joined: Oct 13
Posts: 15

      quote  
Posted: 02 Feb 2014, 13:27
I'm not a exercise expert by any means. However, in my own experience I have found high intensity low repetition exercises to work the best for me. lots of weight, slow and steady 5 rep sets no more than 5 times, lots of recovery. I work out 2x a week using this method and am very happy with the results.

So to answer your question: In my totally amateur opinion, you are right.
corifeo

Joined: Nov 13
Posts: 294

      quote  
Posted: 02 Feb 2014, 14:18
There are three types of resistance exercise Isotonic “free weights”, Isometric “stationary using your body weight” and Isokinetic “machine weight lifting” all three forms have strengths and weakness, with this you can do three types of Intensity, volume, and frequency called Low, Med and High the most effective one being Med.

http://www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/is-training-intensity-the-real-key-to-building-muscle-mass-40539
http://www.slideshare.net/pdhpemag/types-of-resistance-training

Now about your question the good thing about Isokinetic is that you do not
have to pay that much attention to proper form because the machine does it for you. Proper form is always a good thing but it’s more important with Isotonic and Isometric.

RachK

Joined: Aug 09
Posts: 26

      quote  
Posted: 11 Feb 2014, 14:22
I'm a personal trainer and tempo of repetitions is one of the ways to vary the effect of an exercise (the others being things like weight lifted and # of repetitions). There are benefits to doing things more quickly or more slowly depending on what your goals are and the overall design of your program. If you have a good program to follow (or a good trainer to work with) they should discuss the tempo to perform the exercises at. There's really no right/wrong way as long as the form of the exercise is correct
wholefoodnut

Joined: Jul 12
Posts: 1,436

      quote  
Posted: 11 Feb 2014, 20:37
Thanks rach. Right now no trainer but i will set up some sessions with one once work slows down after tax season. Really hard for me to commit to a time until then. Most of my equipment and weight training was quite some time ago after injuries including one month of 8 hours a day 5 days a week of work hardening after a 4 disc cervical fusion. They stressed the slow, steady, and using the full range of motion on the equipment.

"Its not enough for the food to just be nutritious. It must also be delicious, or eating will feel like a punishment." Meg Galvin, Smartpeople Cookbook.

Jeri
S L Lockhart

Joined: Mar 14
Posts: 8

      quote  
Posted: 03 Apr 2014, 20:09
Very Happy Yes you are right in your assumption of using weight machines.
I used to go to the gym three days a week and that was something they stressed daily to whoever would listen.
I think that any exercise done should be done slowly and with great focus. When you do anything focused you get a better workout and you control your body better than if you are just hurrying thru a set or routine.
All the books I have read on exercising states to go slowly and deliberately thru the workout and you will get greater results quicker, with less harm to your muscles.
northernmusi...

Joined: Dec 13
Posts: 301

      quote  
Posted: 03 Apr 2014, 20:55
The idea that the negative motion is the most beneficial has fallen recently into question. General consensus seems to be that the most beneficial portion is the the power stage. Bringing the weight down in a controlled manner is still extremely important as letting the weight fall taxes tendons and ligaments. Depending on th weight, you could injure yourself. Don't lift anything bigger than you can handle safely.
***

Exercise isn't diet. Diet isn't exercise. Binging trumps exercise.
wholefoodnut

Joined: Jul 12
Posts: 1,436

      quote  
Posted: 04 Apr 2014, 04:43
I did recently have a session with a trainer. She did also say for the machines slow and steady was the best for me due to old injuries and arthritis in knees, ankles, and neck.

"Its not enough for the food to just be nutritious. It must also be delicious, or eating will feel like a punishment." Meg Galvin, Smartpeople Cookbook.

Jeri
northernmusi...

Joined: Dec 13
Posts: 301

      quote  
Posted: 06 Apr 2014, 12:19
I'm not crazy about machines. The problem is that you have to conform to them. With free weights your body moves how it wants to move. With machines, your body has to change to suit them. As you get older, you're more and more susceptible to injury from form problems. It's hard to adjust form on a machine because it's you that has to change.
***

Exercise isn't diet. Diet isn't exercise. Binging trumps exercise.
wholefoodnut

Joined: Jul 12
Posts: 1,436

      quote  
Posted: 06 Apr 2014, 14:21
Hadn't thought about it that way. I do have a small set of free weights that I've been using some. I'd need a bunch of training on the free weights as I've never used any except my little ones. I feel fairly safe using the resistance machines. I'm not sure what you call the ropes with handles that you use your own body weight against, I've been using some of those, and some that are attached to weights for bicep curls and some other arm ones. Venturing a bit more into some of the other areas in the gym as I've been watching what others do.

"Its not enough for the food to just be nutritious. It must also be delicious, or eating will feel like a punishment." Meg Galvin, Smartpeople Cookbook.

Jeri



Forum Search
Advanced forum search



Latest Posts

Working in exercise when you work 2 jobs
I'm working 20 hours a day, 5 days a week. Weekends are for cleaning, bills, running the kids to sports etc. My day starts at 4:15 am and ends at midnight. By the time Friday comes around I'm ...
by katygrl73 on 03 Mar 15 10:52 AM
Workout
Wow, well done. O.O I can understand that 100lbs would be awesome, but be proud of what you've already lost! That's an amazing achievement. I'm pretty chuffed to have lost around 36lbs, ... ...
by Somebody Else on 09 Feb 15 06:15 PM
workouts
I tyically do leg raises, standard situps, crunches, and try to incorperate the abs into my chinups/pullups.
by Somebody Else on 09 Feb 15 06:13 PM
bottom abs
The lower abs are typically the last to be seen; it's the stubborn area for a guy. For a woman, it's the bum.
by Somebody Else on 09 Feb 15 06:10 PM
What leg workouts can I do at home if I don't have access to a gym?
I do squats (quads, thighs, bum) lunges (quads, thighs, bum) toe raises (calves) biking on highest setting (quads seem to feel that the most) and that's more or less it. You can add weight (dumbbells ...
by Somebody Else on 09 Feb 15 05:59 PM

Member Tip

average member ranking
by member Darkangeline
Cheese is NOT it's own food group, Although personally I think it should be. :)
13 Jan 12 for diet Calorie Count