Toxic Sugar: Fantastic Video on the Obesity Epidemic from ABC Australia

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onedaat

Joined: Aug 12
Posts: 326

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Posted: 26 Aug 2013, 11:53
Toxic Sugar

Published on Aug 12, 2013

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In only a few decades, there are now more obese people on the planet than there are undernourished. When it comes to getting fat, we've come to believe it's as simple as 'calories in' versus 'calories out' - if you want to shed the kilos, you need to burn more calories than you consume. But not all calories are the same. Some people absorb calories more efficiently and it matters what types of foods your calories are coming from. Sugar is now being proposed by experts as the new dietary villain that's making us fat and sick. Dr Maryanne Demasi investigates the bitter truth about the dangers of a sweet diet.


Is sugar toxic and the cause of the obesity epidemic? Here’s a great new video called Toxic Sugar. It’s a recent segment from the major Australian science program Catalyst, on ABC.

It’s arguably the best 18-minute introduction ever made on the true causes of the obesity epidemic. The program features the #1 enemy of the sugar industry: professor Robert Lustig. Also appearing: science writer Gary Taubes and obesity expert professor Michael Crowley.

See it and then tell your friends. This needs to be seen by a lot of people.
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"It is in vain to speak of cures, or think of remedies, until such time as we have considered the causes . . . cures must be imperfect, lame, and to no purpose, wherein the causes have not first been searched.”

- Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy

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If you don't read the newspaper, you are uninformed. If you do read the newspaper, you are misinformed. - Mark Twain

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mrspackrat

Joined: Aug 10
Posts: 553

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Posted: 26 Aug 2013, 13:17
And the important point is sugar isn't just sweet stuff like soda, candies, cookies, etc. But it's really our refined carbs/packaged/processed foods that are filled with sugars. These foods are high in calories and bad for our bodies and once removed, weightloss is much easier.
this damn tracker below hasn't been right in months! My current weight is 137!
mummydee

Joined: Feb 10
Posts: 2,153

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Posted: 26 Aug 2013, 17:11
The absolute worst add I ever saw was a 7 up commercial from the 50's, It depicted a baby with a nipple on a 7 up bottle and the rep from the industry claimed.. ' if you can get them hooked by 2 , we'll have the for life!"

sickening and so sad

http://consumerist.com/2011/06/28/1956-ad-says-feed-7-up-to-babies/

http://www.thelunchtray.com/vintage-ad-touts-7-up-as-a-beverage-for-babies/
onedaat

Joined: Aug 12
Posts: 326

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Posted: 27 Aug 2013, 11:11
What gets me is that Pepsi and Coke are two of the biggest sponsors of the American Dietetic Association and American Diabetes Association.


Quote:
American Diabetes Association and American Dietetic Association Sell Themselves Out, Sacrificing their Health Mission for Money
Two national organizations that were previously committed to improving the public's health by fighting unhealthy eating have sacrificed their health missions, selling out to Big Soda in order to yield tens of thousands of dollars, while at the same time allowing themselves to be used as a public relations and marketing tool for the Coca-Cola Company.

According to a press release issued on August 31 by the Coca-Cola Company, the American Diabetes Association has accepted $125,000 from Coca-Cola and the American Dietetic Association has accepted $100,000 from Coca-Cola. These donations were originally reported over at the Fooducate blog in a post entitled "Here's How Coke is Buying the Silence of Health Organizations. For Pocket Change."

In the Fooducate post, Hemi Weingarten writes: "This is simply unfathomable. How can the American Diabetes Association in its right mind take money from the company that contributes the most to this terrible disease? More than 20 million Americans suffer from Type 2 diabetes, and most of them acquired it from overloading their bodies with junk foods and drinks. Liquid candy like Coke shares the responsibility. Another 75 million Americans are well on their way to diabetes because of excess consumption. Please, please, please, don’t bring up the “moderation” angle, or tell us that there are no bad foods (drinks). Sugary soft drinks cannot be consumed in moderation when they are pushed into our faces with $10,000,000,000.00 worth of marketing spend every year. Do you really think a measly education pamphlet or 30 minute community center class has a chance against the marketing might of Coke’s top notch ad agencies?"

"Coke has paid less than a hundredth of a percent of its marketing budget to buy the silence of these organizations and their leaders. How can they now be firm and adamant when they shook hands with Coke executives and took their money? The American Dietetic Association has an annual budget of around $100 million. Does it really need to take money from Coca Cola?"
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"It is in vain to speak of cures, or think of remedies, until such time as we have considered the causes . . . cures must be imperfect, lame, and to no purpose, wherein the causes have not first been searched.”

- Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy

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If you don't read the newspaper, you are uninformed. If you do read the newspaper, you are misinformed. - Mark Twain

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erika2633

Joined: Nov 11
Posts: 804

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Posted: 27 Aug 2013, 14:08
I'm always going to cringe anytime I see people villainizing one macronutrient over another, and the phrase "toxic sugar" just makes me shake my head.. BUT I watched the first part of the video until I got to the cereal section (will watch the rest later) - I will never understand those sugary cereals.. They're pretty much just like a big bowl of sugar with milk dumped on them.. I guess if it's used as a rare treat, then fine, but I know families that give their kids waffle crisp and captain crunch on a daily basis.. Why not just give them a cupcake and a Fun Dip and send them on their way?


Someone who is busier than you is working out right now.
There will come a day when you can no longer do this. Today is not that day.
gnat824

Joined: Jul 10
Posts: 1,691

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Posted: 27 Aug 2013, 14:54
Toxicity is ALWAYS a matter of quantity, so yes, sugar is toxic. And so are water, salt and iron. Arsenic is a common poison, but also an essential nutrient. Omega 3 isn't a miracle cure - it's just needed to balance the high amount of Omega 6 that is found in the modern diet. It's all about the balance and the idea that certain things are inherently "good" and "bad" is always an oversimplification (except for trans fats?). Yes, it's true that large amounts of procesed sugar is not a great thing, partially because the insulin response and partially because it's empty calories, pure energy, and doesn't deliver any other nutrients along with it. But does that mean that it's going to kill you to include some of it in your diet? No. Good nutrition means eating a wide range of foods in as close to their natural state as possible but you don't have to exclusively eat that kind of food to be healthy. And no one will EVER convince me that fruit is unhealthy because of the natural sugars.
- Natalie
onedaat

Joined: Aug 12
Posts: 326

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Posted: 27 Aug 2013, 15:09
lol at your equivocations. You forgot milk, how dangerous is whole milk if you consume 60 gallons in one sitting? Pretty, pretty bad, therefore, by "logic" it's exactly equivalent to the harm even a few ounces of sugar presents to overweight people, it's science donchaknow LOL. science
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"It is in vain to speak of cures, or think of remedies, until such time as we have considered the causes . . . cures must be imperfect, lame, and to no purpose, wherein the causes have not first been searched.”

- Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you don't read the newspaper, you are uninformed. If you do read the newspaper, you are misinformed. - Mark Twain

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mummydee

Joined: Feb 10
Posts: 2,153

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Posted: 27 Aug 2013, 16:43
Personally I believe sugar is a toxic because it could cause injury or death, and that is what toxic is by definition.
It has absolutely no nutritional value and I for one, believe it to be addictive.
It is the drug of the food industry. Yes , it sweetens things and makes them taste wonderful, but also leaves you craving more. And the more you eat, the more you crave, it's a vicious cycle. And for people who have addictive personalities, resisting this craving is horrible.
So eating a so called "treat" can trigger the whole craving cycle again. For someone on a diet or eating plan, trying to lose weight, this can be the treat that sets them back. For those that can handle it, carry on and enjoy...

I have learned to use Stevia so I cook and bake and we have all the 'treats' we need with no processed sugar at all.
onedaat

Joined: Aug 12
Posts: 326

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Posted: 27 Aug 2013, 17:32
People who deny the addictive nature of sugar are fooling themselves. Have you ever noticed how alcoholics when they go off the bottle will start craving sugar? It's because the sugar and the alcohol are very similar and the sugar acts as a substituent for the alcohol.

Sweet preference, sugar addiction and the familial history of alcohol dependence: shared neural pathways and genes.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20648910
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Contemporary research has shown that a high number of alcohol-dependent and other drug-dependent individuals have a sweet preference, specifically for foods with a high sucrose concentration. Moreover, both human and animal studies have demonstrated that in some brains the consumption of sugar-rich foods or drinks primes the release of euphoric endorphins and dopamine within the nucleus accumbens, in a manner similar to some drugs of abuse. The neurobiological pathways of drug and "sugar addiction" involve similar neural receptors, neurotransmitters, and hedonic regions in the brain. Craving, tolerance, withdrawal and sensitization have been documented in both human and animal studies. In addition, there appears to be cross sensitization between sugar addiction and narcotic dependence in some individuals. It has also been observed that the biological children of alcoholic parents, particularly alcoholic fathers, are at greater risk to have a strong sweet preference, and this may manifest in some with an eating disorder. In the last two decades research has noted that specific genes may underlie the sweet preference in alcohol- and drug-dependent individuals, as well as in biological children of paternal alcoholics. There also appears to be some common genetic markers between alcohol dependence, bulimia, and obesity, such as the A1 allele gene and the dopamine 2 receptor gene.
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"It is in vain to speak of cures, or think of remedies, until such time as we have considered the causes . . . cures must be imperfect, lame, and to no purpose, wherein the causes have not first been searched.”

- Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you don't read the newspaper, you are uninformed. If you do read the newspaper, you are misinformed. - Mark Twain

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mummydee

Joined: Feb 10
Posts: 2,153

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Posted: 27 Aug 2013, 17:37
I compare sugar addiction to heroin addiction. You can't just have one hit! Even Lay's used it on their add campaigns... "Bet you can't eat just one!"
onedaat

Joined: Aug 12
Posts: 326

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Posted: 27 Aug 2013, 19:02
Sugar as addictive as cocaine, heroin, studies suggest By Rosemary Black / DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
Thursday, December 11, 2008, 7:13 PM
Sugar cravings are no joke - those sweet treats may be as addictive as hard drugs.

It's one addiction that won't land you in court or an inpatient rehab. But sugar - as anyone who mainlines sweets can attest - can be just as habit-forming as cocaine.

Researchers at Princeton University studying bingeing and dependency in rats have found that when the animals ingest large amounts of sugar, their brains undergo changes similar to the changes in the brains of people who abuse illegal drugs like cocaine and heroin.

"Our evidence from an animal model suggests that bingeing on sugar can act in the brain in ways very similar to drugs of abuse," says lead researcher and Princeton psychology professor Bart Hoebel.

In the studies, he explains, animals that drank large amounts of sugar water when hungry experienced behavioral changes, too, along with signs of withdrawal and even long-lasting effects that resemble cravings.

Some people experience powerful cravings for sweets - internal messages telling them to eat sugar even though they know it's bad for them - says Dr. Louis Aronne, director of the Comprehensive Weight Control Center at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center. "These people get strong urges to consume sweets, and these cravings border on addiction," he says. "When they eat sugar, just like when someone ingests cocaine, some people get that feeling of well-being, a rush that makes them feel good for a period of time. When the sweets are taken away, the people just don't feel right."

In the animals studied at Princeton, bingeing released a surge of the neurotransmitter dopamine in the brain. "It's been known that drugs of abuse release or increase the levels of dopamine in that part of the brain," Hoebel said.

After the rats' sugar supply was withdrawn, they became anxious. Their teeth chattered and they grew unwilling to venture into the open arm of their maze. Instead, they stayed in the tunnel of the maze.

Deprived of their sugar, the rats displayed signs of withdrawal similar to the symptoms seen in people when they stop smoking, drinking alcohol, or using drugs.

Just as not everyone has the tendency to become an alcoholic or a drug addict, so not everyone is hard wired to be a sugar-holic, Aronne says. And there is certainly effective treatment for a sweet addiction, though it's not likely to go down easily among those who like their candy and cookies.

"If people eat starch and sugar in the morning, it's very difficult to get their behavior in control and they'll be craving sweets all day," Aronne says. "So we have people start out their day by eating protein and vegetables in the morning."

[/quote]

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"It is in vain to speak of cures, or think of remedies, until such time as we have considered the causes . . . cures must be imperfect, lame, and to no purpose, wherein the causes have not first been searched.”

- Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you don't read the newspaper, you are uninformed. If you do read the newspaper, you are misinformed. - Mark Twain

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mummydee

Joined: Feb 10
Posts: 2,153

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Posted: 27 Aug 2013, 19:17
Thanks onedaat, I can always count on you to pull out of your stores of studies, what I say.

I hate that sugar is looked upon as a 'treat'... it's a mindset we have to stop. If we want to have a treat on b'days etc. we make quinoa cake with stevia which is delicious. I know eventually my grandson will be out in this world and make his own decisions, but for now, no sugar! We don't even have cable or satellite so his wee mind won't be inundated with commercials that make him desire crap.
onedaat

Joined: Aug 12
Posts: 326

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Posted: 27 Aug 2013, 20:17
I live with a sugar addict. He honestly doesn't see himself that way, very fit, physically active, doesn't drink alcohol because it's bad for him yet eats a ton of sugar each day. Either 1/2 cake or 1/2 container of ice cream plus about 1/3 pitcher of kool-aid. Maybe even some donuts or cookies if they are available at work. He has absolutely 0 insight into this behavior because he is in great shape. For dinner it's generally pasta with some dressing or potatoes. I ask if he could give up carbs for a month he says probably.
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"It is in vain to speak of cures, or think of remedies, until such time as we have considered the causes . . . cures must be imperfect, lame, and to no purpose, wherein the causes have not first been searched.”

- Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you don't read the newspaper, you are uninformed. If you do read the newspaper, you are misinformed. - Mark Twain

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Diablo360x

Joined: Jul 11
Posts: 816

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Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 04:25
Wow, poor orthorexics.
Love your food or risk failure. No quick fixes, this is a lifestyle change. No extremes are needed just consistency.
mummydee

Joined: Feb 10
Posts: 2,153

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Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 04:56
Seriously? "orthorexics" - "focus may turn into a fixation so extreme that it can lead to severe malnutrition or even death."

I seriously doubt that anyone has ever died or been malnourished from not eating sugar.

"solely concerned with the quality of the food they put in their bodies, refining and restricting their diets according to their personal understanding of which foods are truly 'pure'."

pretty much describes me and I see nothing wrong with it.


gnat824

Joined: Jul 10
Posts: 1,691

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Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 09:28
So everything that has the potential for abuse is bad? By that logic, we should stop shopping, stop exercising, cancel poker night, never have a glass of wine and and of course ditch the morning coffee because these all trigger addictive responses in some people, too. Where does it stop?

People crave sugar because it's hard-wired into us. Fat and sugar are good energy sources that are harder to find in nature, so its 100% natural for us to crave them. Sugar is a readily available energy source, so not without value, especially when you're in a situation where you are excerting yourself and need to replenish your stores quickly. Interestingly enough, naturally occuring sugars are also an indicator of when the nutrient levels are highest, so the craving for sweet helps us to get better nutrition. The real problem lies in the fact that they're very easy to come by in the modern world and biologically, we haven't adjusted to that shift, which just occured in the last century or two. But THAT is why most of us think of sugar as a treat. It's absurd to think that we can shame ourselves out of a biological urge- it doesn't work for sex, why on earth would the sweet craving be any different?

It's about context - in today's world, ready access to large quantities of sugar is a liability. But that doesn't mean that sugar is the villian so much as our modern lifestyle. For some people, sugar is something that does have to be avoided or carefully managed- including medical conditions like diabeties or metabolic disorders, or those same people who are susceptable to it's addictive properties (just like some people can't handle limited exposure to alcohol or play a few hands of cards without triggering an addiction). But for most normal, healthy people, there's nothing wrong with a moderate sugar intake.

PS- My point on toxicity is that it's always in the dose. Medicine is poison in a controlled dose. Nothing is inherently toxic- it becomes so at certain thresholds of exposure, in combination with certain things, given a certain medical condition, etc. The assertion that "sugar is toxic" without context is meaningless. Especially when you consider that carbohydrates are all turned into some form of sugar when you digest them...
- Natalie
eKatherine

Joined: Aug 12
Posts: 1,286

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Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 10:11
Haha, the "orthorexic" is the guy who eats half a cake and drinks a pitcher of kool-aid a day, in addition to lots of other sweets and baked goods.
eKatherine

Joined: Aug 12
Posts: 1,286

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Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 10:20
gnat824 wrote:
So everything that has the potential for abuse is bad? By that logic, we should stop shopping, stop exercising, cancel poker night, never have a glass of wine and and of course ditch the morning coffee because these all trigger addictive responses in some people, too. Where does it stop?


So you're saying that everything that is bad is equally bad, even though some things would kill somebody on the spot, some might merely cause them to be hungrier a few moments earlier, and some might lead to an early death from degenerative illness? I'll repeat your question back to you. Where does it stop? Because you are trying to convince us that there should be no stop for any of us.

Quote:
People crave sugar because it's hard-wired into us. Fat and sugar are good energy sources that are harder to find in nature, so its 100% natural for us to crave them. Sugar is a readily available energy source, so not without value, especially when you're in a situation where you are excerting yourself and need to replenish your stores quickly.


That's why competitive athletes eat cups of sugar from a spoon to keep themselves from getting low in energy...

No wait, they don't. They try to eat balanced nutrition to supply their bodies with more than just empty calories.

I recall growing up in the 60s. Dr. Fredrick Stare of Harvard Medical School had a column in the newspaper where he would pontificate on how good sugar was for us, because it provides us with lots of calories, and we need calories.

That's what you're saying. It is all about context, and you're trying to convince overweight people on a diet site to eat more sugar, because people who rarely exercise to the max (99.99% of the population) can't get enough calories and are probably wasting away and can't figure out how to stop it.

This is ridiculous. Enjoy your sugar, then enjoy more of it. And still more. Stop trying to convince people who have found a way to control their weight through healthy eating that what they really need is to substitute pure sucrose for most of the whole, natural foods in their diets. It makes you sound like a sock puppet.
erika2633

Joined: Nov 11
Posts: 804

      quote  
Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 10:53
eKatherine wrote:
you're trying to convince overweight people on a diet site to eat more sugar, because people who rarely exercise to the max (99.99% of the population) can't get enough calories and are probably wasting away and can't figure out how to stop it.

This is ridiculous. Enjoy your sugar, then enjoy more of it. And still more. Stop trying to convince people who have found a way to control their weight through healthy eating that what they really need is to substitute pure sucrose for most of the whole, natural foods in their diets. It makes you sound like a sock puppet.


What?? Who said that? Who is trying to convince people to eat more sugar? Nobody. They're just saying that the fear-mongering about "toxic" sugar is unhelpful. People that come to this site that are confused about starting on the path to a healthy lifestyle don't need to be scared into cutting sugar completely out of their lives. It's a huge step to take right off the bat and will likely cause people to fail at their attempts.. And not only that, they will probably just cling to any products that they can get that claim to be "sugar-free" and then get all of the artificial sweeteners in their bodies instead, which are just as "toxic," right?

And what are we to tell someone that is addicted to fruit? Go eat more whole, natural foods... Oh wait, that's fruit too...

Yes, we all want to put the best foods into our bodies to keep ourselves healthy and happy - but we're kidding ourselves if we think everyone in the world is going to eat only nutritionally dense foods 100% of the time..


Someone who is busier than you is working out right now.
There will come a day when you can no longer do this. Today is not that day.
mummydee

Joined: Feb 10
Posts: 2,153

      quote  
Posted: 28 Aug 2013, 19:50
I understand your argument and can 1/2 agree with it, but when I was at my peak I wish I had someone say to me, stop, don't eat any or you'll fall off. If I had quit cold turkey way back when, it would've taken me alot less longer to get to my goal. By "treating' myself every once in a while I then slipped and 'treated' myself more... and it became a long and difficult journey.
I went cold turkey with no sugar and that was the end of it! I stopped craving it and enjoying that one bite that lead to another.. and I lost the weight.
So, I say, we are all different. but to say that you're setting people up for failure by saying quit it 100% is not always a given. Some need it 100%, like myself, sugar free for 20 years and don't miss it one bit, it is possible.



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