Weight lifting and %RDI

previous topic · next topic
Jude77

Joined: Oct 12
Posts: 4

      quote  
Posted: 08 Oct 2012, 19:50
I do heavy weightlifting and I try to eat healthy, but healthy food doesn't have many calories. I have trouble meeting my RDI. I don't know what I can eat that is healthy where I can reach my RDI. I eat egg whites, stay away from sugar, Subway, brown rice, low calorie protein bars... etc.

I' 6'2, 304 pounds and the weight lifting and cardio takes out 1,300 calories on the Fatsecret Program, but to eat like a normal person, I can't reach my RDI which is 2,900 calories. By eating healthy, I can only get to 1,500.

Does anyone know any healthy foods that have a lot of calories without fat and carbohydrates? I doubt that I can eat a couple of donuts to make up the missing calories and get 100% of my RDI... ha ha ha ha Wouldn't that be nice??? Ha ha

Anyone that can help please do. It will be greatly appreciated.
Nimm

Joined: Dec 10
Posts: 669

      quote  
Posted: 08 Oct 2012, 20:13
Jude77 wrote:
I doubt that I can eat a couple of donuts to make up the missing calories and get 100% of my RDI... ha ha ha ha Wouldn't that be nice??? Ha ha


If you're staying within your calorie limits, getting sufficient protein, essential dietary fats, and micronutrients, you can do just that.

With very limited exceptions, diets are healthy or unhealthy, rather than individual foods. For example, if I eat nothing but broccoli all day, I'm better off having a cheeseburger at my next meal, rather than more broccoli.

With a calorie budget as large as yours, you can easily get the macro- and micro-nutrients you need while having calories to spare for some of the foods you're unfairly labeling as "unhealthy."

If you'd like to read a lay article written by a bona fide expert on the topic, I recommend The Dirt on Clean Eating by Alan Aragon. Don't let the URL fool you. The man knows what he's talking about:

Quote:
One of the fundamental pitfalls of dichotomizing foods as good or bad, or clean or dirty, is that it can form a destructive relationship with food. This isn’t just an empty claim; it’s been seen in research. Smith and colleagues found that flexible dieting was associated with the absence of overeating, lower bodyweight, and the absence of depression and anxiety [22]. They also found that a strict all-or-nothing approach to dieting was associated with overeating and increased bodyweight. Similarly, Stewart and colleagues found that rigid dieting was associated with symptoms of an eating disorder, mood disturbances, and anxiety [23]. Flexible dieting was not highly correlated with these qualities. Although these are observational study designs with self-reported data, anyone who spends enough time among fitness buffs knows that these findings are not off the mark.


Anecdotally, I've experienced this. I've never observed any difference in my health, body composition, workout performance, or rate of fat loss/muscle gain, with a completely strict diet, as opposed to one that has sufficient macro- and micro-nutrients, but with some discretionary calories thrown in the mix.
Jude77

Joined: Oct 12
Posts: 4

      quote  
Posted: 09 Oct 2012, 20:25
I have 580 calories according to the article. That's daily. That's a lot, isn't it?
Nimm

Joined: Dec 10
Posts: 669

      quote  
Posted: 09 Oct 2012, 22:51
Jude77 wrote:
I have 580 calories according to the article. That's daily. That's a lot, isn't it?


Yes and no - if you're able to lose weight on 2900 calories per day, 2300 calories should be plenty to meet most of your nutritional needs. Once you've met those needs, more is not necessarily better - you can invite health problems from overdoses of some vitamins and minerals, for example. So having even 580 "discretionary" calories to help you reach your daily target won't undo the nutritional value of the rest of your diet.

The 10-20% figure discussed in the article is just a rule of thumb to help ensure that more refined and/or calorie-dense foods don't displace the nutrition that you need. But as long as you're meeting those needs and staying within your overall calorie goal, some flexibility in your diet won't interfere with your fat loss or strength gain. To the contrary, a little flexibility will likely make it easier for you to stick to your diet over the long run - and that's the real goal.
evelyn64

Joined: Jan 08
Posts: 520

      quote  
Posted: 09 Oct 2012, 23:12
A glass or two of red wine is said to be beneficial Wink

IT NEVER GETS EASIER - YOU JUST GET BETTER.



Diablo360x

Joined: Jul 11
Posts: 781

      quote  
Posted: 10 Oct 2012, 01:34
Nimm wrote:
Jude77 wrote:
I doubt that I can eat a couple of donuts to make up the missing calories and get 100% of my RDI... ha ha ha ha Wouldn't that be nice??? Ha ha


If you're staying within your calorie limits, getting sufficient protein, essential dietary fats, and micronutrients, you can do just that.

With very limited exceptions, diets are healthy or unhealthy, rather than individual foods. For example, if I eat nothing but broccoli all day, I'm better off having a cheeseburger at my next meal, rather than more broccoli.

With a calorie budget as large as yours, you can easily get the macro- and micro-nutrients you need while having calories to spare for some of the foods you're unfairly labeling as "unhealthy."

If you'd like to read a lay article written by a bona fide expert on the topic, I recommend The Dirt on Clean Eating by Alan Aragon. Don't let the URL fool you. The man knows what he's talking about:

Quote:
One of the fundamental pitfalls of dichotomizing foods as good or bad, or clean or dirty, is that it can form a destructive relationship with food. This isn’t just an empty claim; it’s been seen in research. Smith and colleagues found that flexible dieting was associated with the absence of overeating, lower bodyweight, and the absence of depression and anxiety [22]. They also found that a strict all-or-nothing approach to dieting was associated with overeating and increased bodyweight. Similarly, Stewart and colleagues found that rigid dieting was associated with symptoms of an eating disorder, mood disturbances, and anxiety [23]. Flexible dieting was not highly correlated with these qualities. Although these are observational study designs with self-reported data, anyone who spends enough time among fitness buffs knows that these findings are not off the mark.


Anecdotally, I've experienced this. I've never observed any difference in my health, body composition, workout performance, or rate of fat loss/muscle gain, with a completely strict diet, as opposed to one that has sufficient macro- and micro-nutrients, but with some discretionary calories thrown in the mix.


What a breathe of fresh air this post is in this forum.

Jude, I regularly have whatever I want, as long as it fits my calorie goals. Go for it.
Love your food or risk failure. No quick fixes, this is a lifestyle change. No extremes are needed just consistency.
gerdik

Joined: Nov 10
Posts: 38

      quote  
Posted: 10 Oct 2012, 08:17
Diablo and Nimm - I couldn't agree with you guys more. After reading that article it really made me think about my current eating habits and helps affirm that what I have been doing these past years has worked (for maintaining). I really enjoyed the part related to upper and lower ranges based on what your goals are, gaining or losing mass. I will definitely be using that in mind with my current goals. Thanks Nimm!
NCSF - Certified Personal Trainer (Oct 2010)
Jude77

Joined: Oct 12
Posts: 4

      quote  
Posted: 12 Oct 2012, 10:37
Wow, it's just kind of hard to believe this. I'm so used to second guessing everything that I eat. I went to a Chinese buffet and it took a s##tload of servings to match my calorie intake. This just doesn't feel right.
Nimm

Joined: Dec 10
Posts: 669

      quote  
Posted: 12 Oct 2012, 10:56
Jude77 wrote:
Wow, it's just kind of hard to believe this. I'm so used to second guessing everything that I eat. I went to a Chinese buffet and it took a s##tload of servings to match my calorie intake. This just doesn't feel right.


I'd be careful with a lot of servings of Chinese food - the calories in any restaurant meal will just be an estimate, and can very wildly. But as long as you really are staying within your calorie limit, and the prepared foods aren't displacing the other nutrients you need - it's really fine.

The foods that are commonly thought of as "unhealthy" have that reputation in large part because they can make it easy to overeat (more calories by volume, more palatable), and can be low on micronutrients - like vitamins, minerals, and fiber.

Again, the important principle is moderation - as long as you don't displace the more nutrient-rich foods or go over your calorie limit, there's no good evidence that your body composition, health, rate of fat loss or muscle gain will be adversely affected. But because individual responses may vary, see how you respond. Just don't avoid entire classes of foods simply because you think you should, or because the internet told you to.
Having said that, it's not wise to go too far in the other direction and end up eating nothing but fast food and a multivitamin. Moderation and adequate nutrients are the keys.
NCNOLE

Joined: Feb 11
Posts: 1,183

      quote  
Posted: 12 Oct 2012, 11:02
I agree chinese food is hard to get a true estimate as it is made differently at each restaurant and is typically loaded with sodium. I love it, but I avoid it simply b/c I can't get a good estimate on intake. I make my own sweet and sour tofu, sesame ginger tofu... Not quite the same, but still good.

It looks to me like you have resolved your issue - you have a few days where you ate almost 5k calories. If you eat healthier then you should be under your recommended intake and as long as you aren't going hungry I think that is okay. Just remember that as you lose weight you burn less calories and require less calories. So at some point, you may need to adjust. Just eating healthier foods and watching your portion sizes may be enough for you to lose a significant amount of weight at this point.
Jude77

Joined: Oct 12
Posts: 4

      quote  
Posted: 14 Oct 2012, 19:32
My workouts are intense. I gain weight in muscle. I don't know if my RDI will go lower or raise. I don't go hungry though. Thanks, you guys. One last question and then I'll stop being selfish go around the forum and help others as you all have helped me.

Is fasting for a day to three days something bad for weight loss or is it bad?
tapeekcm

Joined: Dec 09
Posts: 58

      quote  
Posted: 08 Nov 2012, 08:11
I think it depends on your goal from the fasting. Personally, fasting that long of a period is something I could find hard to do, and could hurt your muscle gains. Something you might want to consider for fasting while maintaing muscle mass is Intermittent Fasting. There are many variations of this method of fasting. The main component being that you are fasted when you workout. In this case, your body will be in a state where it will burning fat. As with any diet or nutritional change, do some research and see which best fits your lifestyle. Here is a site for reference. www.leangains.com.
eKatherine

Joined: Aug 12
Posts: 1,266

      quote  
Posted: 19 Nov 2012, 14:55
I tried periodic fasting a while back. While I did lose weight, I lost a lot of strength. I have no doubt that if I had had a way to measure body fat vs lean body mass at that time, I would have found I had lost muscle.

If you think that "healthy food" doesn't have many calories, it sounds like you are considering "healthy food" to be synonymous with "fat free food". Your body needs fat to function properly. But beyond that, foods containing fat are more satisfying.

Chinese food has lots of oil in it, so if you counted it as though it were nothing but plain vegetables, your calorie count was probably far off.
Diablo360x

Joined: Jul 11
Posts: 781

      quote  
Posted: 19 Nov 2012, 15:23
Losing strength is common when weight is lost. Fasting would not make you lose any more muscle than any other method of losing weight.

If you noticed more strength loss than with other restricted calorie diets, it may have been meal timing. I do believe that peoples energy levels can vary depending on when they eat. Some people are full of energy during fasted training while others feel more fatigued.
Love your food or risk failure. No quick fixes, this is a lifestyle change. No extremes are needed just consistency.



Forum Search
Advanced forum search



Latest Posts

Going Paleo to get my Blood Glucose under control.
Type 2 diabetic here. 3 weeks out and I'm running healthy (100 +/- 20) numbers. So far I'm recommending a Paleo plan for those able to cut the carbs and follow up with daily exercise and close ...
by Stockyguy on 14 Apr 14 08:20 AM
Sleep
I had to quit taking my vitamins for awhile, just gradually adding them back in. The magnesium counter acts the antibacterial for the pneumonia. As always if you are on any meds read the info sheets that ...
by wholefoodnut on 13 Apr 14 05:19 PM
The Asthma - Wheat connection.
Joy of joys. Almost snow mold (yes it's a real thing) time of year here. Add that to dust from the roads when this last bit of snow starts to melt and you've really got something to contend with. ...
by northernmusician on 29 Mar 14 03:36 PM
Woot!
Congrats!
by Draglist on 28 Mar 14 10:09 AM
Slightly elevated blood sugar ... with symptoms!
Thanks Abbytown, thanks abb0, much appreciated!
by Killermartinis on 22 Mar 14 02:34 AM