How much carbs in a day?

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Mzz Recinos

Joined: May 11
Posts: 16

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Posted: 15 Sep 2011, 14:02
I feel like I'm eating too many carbs. Can anyone tell me how many carbs I'm supposed to eat if I'm exercising, wanting to lose weight and gain some muscle?
JoeBlow99

Joined: Sep 11
Posts: 4

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Posted: 15 Sep 2011, 14:06
Carbs are unnecessary. You're not "supposed" to eat any, but they're difficult to eliminate completely. If you hang around 50g per day, you'll lose weight.
gnat824

Joined: Jul 10
Posts: 1,699

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Posted: 15 Sep 2011, 14:14
If you're doing a calorie count, there are no firm guidlines and it's a hotly debated issue. I personally find that 20-25% protein, 25-30% fat and 45-55% carbs is a good balance for me. Some people would flip my protein and carb ratios, but that's way more protein than I can fit in to my eating preferencs. Rather than focusing on a specific number, I would up your protein and make sure as many of your carbs as possible are complex (ie, veggies, fruit, dairy, whole grains, generally unprocessed foods). Ultimately, finding a balance you can live with should be your priority, as cutting carbs in the short term will just lead you to put the weight on again once you add them back in.
- Natalie
pixidaisy

Joined: Jan 10
Posts: 548

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Posted: 15 Sep 2011, 14:38
You can lose weight with a ton of carbs, or as little as 20g net carbs.. Honestly it is personal preference. I can lose weight eating 100g net carbs a day - those come from legumes, nuts, fruits and veggies.



You say you want a cheeseburger but all I hear is "I need love" - a comic strip on the fridge at work.

You have failed only when you quit trying. Until then, you're still in the act of progression. So, never quit trying and you'll never be a failure.

My Blog
http://pixpocketlint.wordpress.com/
latinstylez

Joined: May 11
Posts: 2

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Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 05:46
research the Adkins diet. I've been on a low carb way of living...and i love the results.
rohmancandle

Joined: Sep 11
Posts: 27

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Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 07:24
A Large factor depends on how you are losing weight. If you're just counting calories then low carb is fine. However if you are increasing your activity level at the same time and intense exercise is part of your plan then cutting way back on carbs is counterproductive and in some extreme cases dangerous. There are good carbs and bad carbs. Without posting links and lists as a rule of thumb if its processed and high carb its most likely not good for you. If its fruits, veg, nuts...you know the drill and its part of a balanced diet then its fine to have some carbs.
rockytu

Joined: Aug 11
Posts: 242

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Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 07:41
my doc told me to have 45 per day.it really hasnt been that hard.i love meat and veggies.the change in food is easier for me than talking myself into exercising every day
ONCE YOU MAKE A DECISION THE UNIVERSE CONSPIRES TO MAKE IT HAPPEN!!
kstubblefiel...

Joined: May 10
Posts: 1,400

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Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 07:50
JoeBlow99 wrote:
Carbs are unnecessary.


That's actually not true since Mzz Recino indicated she wants to gain some muscle. It's difficult to gain muscle on a low-carb diet. I noted muscle definition as one of my goals to my trainer & that is why he put me on a carb cycling program instead of just straight low carb. The heavy strength training depletes the stored glycogen in my muscles throughout the week so I need a high-carb day about once a week to replenish it.

If I don't - & I've tried this, doing low carb for more than 6 days because I was "saving" my carb up day for an occasion - my workouts become significantly more difficult, inhibiting my ability to progress, which is necessary in order for me to continue developing muscle.

It sounds like your exercise program will be a big factor in determining your carb level. Find a strength training program that will help you meet your goals first & start working on that. Here's an idea, instead of worrying about how many carbs, how about you make sure you increase your protein high enough to support your exercise?

Kat | NO EXCUSES, JUST RESULTS | Next milestone - 256: 60 lbs lost
2013: still up from 1/1, but coming back down...
2010: 50.4 lbs lost | 2011:17 lbs lost | 2012: 1 lb gained
How I did it: http://stubbysticks.wordpress.com/weight-loss-summary-by-month/
c0sie

Joined: Sep 11
Posts: 4

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Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 08:12
Im taking in around 130g carbs per day and losing on average 5lb per week over the last 4 weeks.

Taking part in a "diet" with minimal carbs is all well and good but once you hit your target weight are you able to cook decent, healthy and balanced meals that will keep your weight steady?

A higher carb diet will still allow weight loss but will also allow more variety to be added to your plate so that you dont go from overweight to ideal weight and not understand how to maintain that.

Thats the #1 mistake I have made in all previous attempts at losing weight; hitting my target but having no clue what to eat to maintain it.
greerp

Joined: Apr 11
Posts: 496

      quote  
Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 09:40
kstubblefield wrote:
JoeBlow99 wrote:
Carbs are unnecessary.


That's actually not true since Mzz Recino indicated she wants to gain some muscle. It's difficult to gain muscle on a low-carb diet. I noted muscle definition as one of my goals to my trainer & that is why he put me on a carb cycling program instead of just straight low carb. The heavy strength training depletes the stored glycogen in my muscles throughout the week so I need a high-carb day about once a week to replenish it.


No its not. There are alot of low carb/paleo body builders. You can gain glycogen by converting fatty acids in your liver - glucogenesis. Recovery can be slower at first, but once you get into a Keto state, it is not a big deal. Your body is very good at converting one macronutrient into another. As long as you eat enough protein it does not matter whether you are keto or not.
kstubblefiel...

Joined: May 10
Posts: 1,400

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Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 10:03
greerp wrote:
There are alot of low carb/paleo body builders.

True. Your mention of keto suggests there must be a particular macro ratio (or at least net carb limit) that helps facilitate muscle gain in the absence of carbs. At my level (60g) I don't think that's low enough for keto...I don't really know for sure though because I don't monitor for it.

I've heard a little about gluconeogenesis, but more so as a tool to help get those last couple of pounds off. For someone like me who still has a ways to go it wasn't recommended because it can slow the metabolism.

Kat | NO EXCUSES, JUST RESULTS | Next milestone - 256: 60 lbs lost
2013: still up from 1/1, but coming back down...
2010: 50.4 lbs lost | 2011:17 lbs lost | 2012: 1 lb gained
How I did it: http://stubbysticks.wordpress.com/weight-loss-summary-by-month/
pixidaisy

Joined: Jan 10
Posts: 548

      quote  
Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 10:17
c0sie wrote:


A higher carb diet will still allow weight loss but will also allow more variety to be added to your plate so that you dont go from overweight to ideal weight and not understand how to maintain that.

Thats the #1 mistake I have made in all previous attempts at losing weight; hitting my target but having no clue what to eat to maintain it.


I don't know how you do not have a variety on your plate doing low carb. I eat around 100g net carbs a day and my plate is actually quite full and has a s##t ton of variety. I still eat fruit, veggies, nuts, legumes, dairy and meat. I just do not eat bread or pasta or things like that. I honestly cannot tell you what my weight loss has been like since switching to this as I haven't been on a scale in 19 days but I can tell you I feel 100% better, my BM's are more regular and my energy level is way higher.

Part of this journey is learning. There is no reason you cannot live lower carb your entire life. Maintaining even on a higher carb diet is not easy - you still need to watch your calories, and portions and you still have to learn. Ask anyone on this site who has entered maint. and they will tell you straight up that it is harder than actually losing the weight because you need to learn how to eat differently anyways so you saying that that mainting on a lower carb diet is not possible is crazy.

Sorry just my opinion but if you do any kind of research you will learn it is possible to maintain at a lower carb level. Even on Atkins you do not stay restricted to 20g net carbs once you are done, you move up the carb ladder until you hit the maint level... and each level adds more carbs.


You say you want a cheeseburger but all I hear is "I need love" - a comic strip on the fridge at work.

You have failed only when you quit trying. Until then, you're still in the act of progression. So, never quit trying and you'll never be a failure.

My Blog
http://pixpocketlint.wordpress.com/
hobo1219

Joined: Aug 11
Posts: 39

      quote  
Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 10:24
I watch my carbs as well as calories since I am high risk for diabetes from family history. The rule of thumb my dr gave me is 2 servings for breakfast, 3 servings for morning snack, 4 servings for lunch, 2 servings for afternoon snack, 4 serving for dinner, 2 servings for late snack. 1 serving = 15 carbs

This will help keep your blood sugar level.

With this rule of thumb and watching my calories for my activity level, I am losing about 3 lbs a week.
sbromwich

Joined: Aug 11
Posts: 80

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Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 11:36
Carbs are definitely needed for aerobic activities, not so much for anaerobic activities. Coincidentally I am experimenting with carb requirements and ate a protein heavy breakfast and cycled as hard as I could into work. I was very close to bonking out after that as I forced myself into the gluconeogenesis mentioned earlier and my body could not produce glucose fast enough. I had to scarf down a pile of fruit when I got into my office to compensate.

Note that carbs are easy to digest, you effectively get a "free" calorie burn if you eat a high protein diet as it takes more energy to digest and convert to usable energy.

For what it's worth, my recommendation would be to aim to get the pie chart at the bottom of the food diary showing an even split between fat/carbs/protein to see how things go for a week, then tinker week by week trying a high fat, carb and protein diet in turn to see which works best for you.
sbromwich

Joined: Aug 11
Posts: 80

      quote  
Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 11:54
kstubblefield wrote:

True. Your mention of keto suggests there must be a particular macro ratio (or at least net carb limit) that helps facilitate muscle gain in the absence of carbs.


In my experience (and I'm not a body builder, but I do weight lifting to maintain bones) aerobic exercise will burn off any excess carbs. Protein is more important for building muscles than carbs.

kstubblefield wrote:

I've heard a little about gluconeogenesis, but more so as a tool to help get those last couple of pounds off. For someone like me who still has a ways to go it wasn't recommended because it can slow the metabolism.


Gluconeogenesis is the process of converting energy stored in the body into usable energy in the form of glucose. It is a part of the Krebs cycle, which is (and I apologise to medical people for this broad generalisation) the process by which energy finds its way into the muscles and goes to lactic acid and back. You should experience some level of gluconeogenesis on a daily basis unless there is an excess of carbs in your system. If there are insufficient carbs in your system and you continue aerobic exercise you will hit what is called in the cycling world "the bonk", which is something amazing to behold - someone going through the bonk looks like they are drunk, can't sit up straight, veer all over the road, etc, then after a drink of sugar water are back to normal - within *seconds*!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4h2x_lzB7E4 shows a marathon runner hitting the bonk. Unfortunately he wasn't shown actually drinking as the camera cut away, but seconds after it cut back he was shown jogging again after looking on the point of collapse.
Leesevol

Joined: Sep 11
Posts: 7

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Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 14:45
I average 50-150 carbs a day and that's just from eating some toast/high fiber cereal and fruit/yogurt. I have a pretty high protein intake as I am working hard to convert my fat to muscle. My diet eliminates (almost completely) sugar intake. My diet has 4 cycles that are designed to confuse the metabolism so it doesn't "settle" and become complacent. Alternating days with natural starches and then having "fasting" days in between keeps the body confused. I also exercise at least an hour a day, most days more.

I started this diet in July have lost 26lbs so far. Still loosing on average 2-3lbs a week after being on the 3rd stage where I get to have the nautral starches every day.

Most "docs" now recommend not eating carbs after 2pm (including fruit), some even say after noon. I'll admit, one or two sneaks in after 2pm for me. Hasn't seemed to hamper my weight loss yet even with the muscle I'm gaining.

Your doctor should be able to help you find the right balance if that option is available to you.
rohmancandle

Joined: Sep 11
Posts: 27

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Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 20:27
Leesevol wrote:


Most "docs" now recommend not eating carbs after 2pm (including fruit), some even say after noon. I'll admit, one or two sneaks in after 2pm for me. Hasn't seemed to hamper my weight loss yet even with the muscle I'm gaining.

Your doctor should be able to help you find the right balance if that option is available to you.


My Doctor is an a-grouper cyclist and triathlete and is on a 90% raw diet with a crazy amount of carbs and I would put him up against anyone in his age group for health and fitness all day long. Before my car accident I crushed carbs after workouts as part of recovery and never had any problems with weight gain. When I showed him what I was doing for recovery he actually recommended HIGHER carb intake.

The whole anti carb movement is all about "anti movement" diets in general. If you're counting calories and not doing anything other than walking for activity and you find that lowering your carb intake is making you feel better then awesome. But putting out blanket statements that lower carb intake is "the best thing" in all cases despite activity level/lifestyle/age/goals is just not true at all.
Nimm

Joined: Dec 10
Posts: 669

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Posted: 20 Sep 2011, 21:00
Leesevol wrote:
Most "docs" now recommend not eating carbs after 2pm (including fruit), some even say after noon.


I've never heard a physician suggest such a thing, and I don't believe there's any evidence to support meal timing effects on weight loss. Other than one recent study suggesting that eating carbs at dinner is better for weight loss than eating them earlier:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21475137
Quote:
This study was designed to investigate the effect of a low-calorie diet with carbohydrates eaten mostly at dinner on anthropometric, hunger/satiety, biochemical, and inflammatory parameters. Hormonal secretions were also evaluated. Seventy-eight police officers (BMI >30) were randomly assigned to experimental (carbohydrates eaten mostly at dinner) or control weight loss diets for 6 months. On day 0, 7, 90, and 180 blood samples and hunger scores were collected every 4 h from 0800 to 2000 hours. Anthropometric measurements were collected throughout the study. Greater weight loss, abdominal circumference, and body fat mass reductions were observed in the experimental diet in comparison to controls. Hunger scores were lower and greater improvements in fasting glucose, average daily insulin concentrations, and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA(IR)), T-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were observed in comparison to controls. The experimental diet modified daily leptin and adiponectin concentrations compared to those observed at baseline and to a control diet. A simple dietary manipulation of carbohydrate distribution appears to have additional benefits when compared to a conventional weight loss diet in individuals suffering from obesity. It might also be beneficial for individuals suffering from insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome. Further research is required to confirm and clarify the mechanisms by which this relatively simple diet approach enhances satiety, leads to better anthropometric outcomes, and achieves improved metabolic response, compared to a more conventional dietary approach.
c0sie

Joined: Sep 11
Posts: 4

      quote  
Posted: 21 Sep 2011, 03:02
rohmancandle wrote:

My Doctor is an a-grouper cyclist and triathlete and is on a 90% raw diet with a crazy amount of carbs and I would put him up against anyone in his age group for health and fitness all day long. Before my car accident I crushed carbs after workouts as part of recovery and never had any problems with weight gain. When I showed him what I was doing for recovery he actually recommended HIGHER carb intake.


Roughly what sort of weight carbs and protein are you taking for recovery after your workouts?

There is so much conflicting information online and "everyone has an opinion" but the most recent stuff I read was that you only need about 15g protein and therefore 45g carbs after a session?

As a vegetarian who doesnt eat fish I struggle to get the 160g(ish) of protein that I apparently need (138(kg) x 1.2) a day other than scoffing egg whites and cottage cheese for England!
gnat824

Joined: Jul 10
Posts: 1,699

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Posted: 21 Sep 2011, 08:07
Interesting article on carbs: http://www.essentialnutrition.org/carbs.php

I'm not familiar with this org but was pleasantly surprised to see that it appears to be a well-rounded association of health, medical and research groups. They have several articles on their webside addressing low carb diets and lifestyles.

I think one thing that is certain is that we still have a lot to learn about diet and nutrition and while emerging science may have some exciting insights, it's worth approaching with a healthy degree of skepticism. You see how wrong we were on the low fat craze and we still can't seem to kill it! Human beings world wide have thrived on a very wide range of diets and so can modern humans- the right balance for everyone is slightly different but you can find it by experimenting with your ratios.
- Natalie



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